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‣ RAD21 Mutations Cause a Human Cohesinopathy

Deardorff, Matthew A.; Wilde, Jonathan J.; Albrecht, Melanie; Dickinson, Emma; Tennstedt, Stephanie; Braunholz, Diana; Mönnich, Maren; Yan, Yuqian; Xu, Weizhen; Gil-Rodríguez, María Concepcion; Clark, Dinah; Hakonarson, Hakon; Halbach, Sara; Micheli
Fonte: Elsevier Publicador: Elsevier
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 08/06/2012 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
371.08043%
The evolutionarily conserved cohesin complex was originally described for its role in regulating sister-chromatid cohesion during mitosis and meiosis. Cohesin and its regulatory proteins have been implicated in several human developmental disorders, including Cornelia de Lange (CdLS) and Roberts syndromes. Here we show that human mutations in the integral cohesin structural protein RAD21 result in a congenital phenotype consistent with a “cohesinopathy.” Children with RAD21 mutations display growth retardation, minor skeletal anomalies, and facial features that overlap findings in individuals with CdLS. Notably, unlike children with mutations in NIPBL, SMC1A, or SMC3, these individuals have much milder cognitive impairment than those with classical CdLS. Mechanistically, these mutations act at the RAD21 interface with the other cohesin proteins STAG2 and SMC1A, impair cellular DNA damage response, and disrupt transcription in a zebrafish model. Our data suggest that, compared to loss-of-function mutations, dominant missense mutations result in more severe functional defects and cause worse structural and cognitive clinical findings. These results underscore the essential role of RAD21 in eukaryotes and emphasize the need for further understanding of the role of cohesin in human development.

‣ Exome Sequencing Identifies INPPL1 Mutations as a Cause of Opsismodysplasia

Huber, Céline; Faqeih, Eissa Ali; Bartholdi, Deborah; Bole-Feysot, Christine; Borochowitz, Zvi; Cavalcanti, Denise P.; Frigo, Amandine; Nitschke, Patrick; Roume, Joelle; Santos, Heloísa G.; Shalev, Stavit A.; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Delezoide, Anne-Li
Fonte: Elsevier Publicador: Elsevier
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 10/01/2013 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
371.08043%
Opsismodysplasia (OPS) is a severe autosomal-recessive chondrodysplasia characterized by pre- and postnatal micromelia with extremely short hands and feet. The main radiological features are severe platyspondyly, squared metacarpals, delayed skeletal ossification, and metaphyseal cupping. In order to identify mutations causing OPS, a total of 16 cases (7 terminated pregnancies and 9 postnatal cases) from 10 unrelated families were included in this study. We performed exome sequencing in three cases from three unrelated families and only one gene was found to harbor mutations in all three cases: inositol polyphosphate phosphatase-like 1 (INPPL1). Screening INPPL1 in the remaining cases identified a total of 12 distinct INPPL1 mutations in the 10 families, present at the homozygote state in 7 consanguinous families and at the compound heterozygote state in the 3 remaining families. Most mutations (6/12) resulted in premature stop codons, 2/12 were splice site, and 4/12 were missense mutations located in the catalytic domain, 5-phosphatase. INPPL1 belongs to the inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate 5-phosphatase family, a family of signal-modulating enzymes that govern a plethora of cellular functions by regulating the levels of specific phosphoinositides. Our finding of INPPL1 mutations in OPS...

‣ Mutations Affecting the SAND Domain of DEAF1 Cause Intellectual Disability with Severe Speech Impairment and Behavioral Problems

Vulto-van Silfhout, Anneke T.; Rajamanickam, Shivakumar; Jensik, Philip J.; Vergult, Sarah; de Rocker, Nina; Newhall, Kathryn J.; Raghavan, Ramya; Reardon, Sara N.; Jarrett, Kelsey; McIntyre, Tara; Bulinski, Joseph; Ownby, Stacy L.; Huggenvik, Jodi
Fonte: Elsevier Publicador: Elsevier
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 01/05/2014 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
371.08043%
Recently, we identified in two individuals with intellectual disability (ID) different de novo mutations in DEAF1, which encodes a transcription factor with an important role in embryonic development. To ascertain whether these mutations in DEAF1 are causative for the ID phenotype, we performed targeted resequencing of DEAF1 in an additional cohort of over 2,300 individuals with unexplained ID and identified two additional individuals with de novo mutations in this gene. All four individuals had severe ID with severely affected speech development, and three showed severe behavioral problems. DEAF1 is highly expressed in the CNS, especially during early embryonic development. All four mutations were missense mutations affecting the SAND domain of DEAF1. Altered DEAF1 harboring any of the four amino acid changes showed impaired transcriptional regulation of the DEAF1 promoter. Moreover, behavioral studies in mice with a conditional knockout of Deaf1 in the brain showed memory deficits and increased anxiety-like behavior. Our results demonstrate that mutations in DEAF1 cause ID and behavioral problems, most likely as a result of impaired transcriptional regulation by DEAF1.