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‣ Interaction between Tobacco and Alcohol Use and the Risk of Head and Neck Cancer: Pooled Analysis in the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology Consortium

HASHIBE, Mia; BRENNAN, Paul; CHUANG, Shu-Chun; BOCCIA, Stefania; CASTELLSAGUE, Xavier; CHEN, Chu; CURADO, Maria Paula; MASO, Luigino Dal; DAUDT, Alexander W.; FABIANOVA, Eleonora; FERNANDEZ, Leticia; WÜNSCH-FILHO, Victor; FRANCESCHI, Silvia; HAYES, Richa
Fonte: AMER ASSOC CANCER RESEARCH Publicador: AMER ASSOC CANCER RESEARCH
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
45.903413%
Background: The magnitude of risk conferred by the interaction between tobacco and alcohol use on the risk of head and neck cancers is not clear because studies have used various methods to quantify the excess head and neck cancer burden. Methods: We analyzed individual-level pooled data from 17 European and American case-control studies (11,221 cases and 16,168 controls) participating in the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology consortium. We estimated the multiplicative interaction parameter (psi) and population attributable risks (PAR). Results: A greater than multiplicative joint effect between ever tobacco and alcohol use was observed for head and neck cancer risk (psi = 2.15; 95% confidence interval, 1.53-3.04). The PAR for tobacco or alcohol was 72% (95% confidence interval, 61-79%) for head and neck cancer, of which 4% was due to alcohol alone, 33% was due to tobacco alone, and 35% was due to tobacco and alcohol combined. The total PAR differed by subsite (64% for oral cavity cancer, 72% for pharyngeal cancer, 89% for laryngeal cancer), by sex (74% for men, 57% for women), by age (33% for cases < 45 years, 73% for cases > 60 years), and by region (84% in Europe, 51% in North America, 83% in Latin America). Conclusions: Our results confirm that the joint effect between tobacco and alcohol use is greater than multiplicative on head and neck cancer risk. However...

‣ Involuntary smoking and head and neck cancer risk: Pooled analysis in the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology Consortium

LEE, Yuan-Chin Amy; BOFFETTA, Paolo; STURGIS, Erich M.; WEI, Qingyi; ZHANG, Zuo-Feng; MUSCAT, Joshua; LAZARUS, Philip; MATOS, Elena; HAYES, Richard B.; WINN, Deborah M.; ZARIDZE, David; WÜNSCH-FILHO, Victor; ELUF-NETO, Jose; KOIFMAN, Sergio; MATES, Dana;
Fonte: AMER ASSOC CANCER RESEARCH Publicador: AMER ASSOC CANCER RESEARCH
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
45.868423%
Although active tobacco smoking has been identified as a major risk factor for head and neck cancer, involuntary smoking has not been adequately evaluated because of the relatively low statistical power in previous studies. We took advantage of data pooled in the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology Consortium to evaluate the role of involuntary smoking in head and neck carcinogenesis. Involuntary smoking exposure data were pooled across six case-control studies in Central Europe, Latin America, and the United States. Adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence interval (95% CI) were estimated for 542 cases and 2,197 controls who reported never using tobacco, and the heterogeneity among the study-specific ORs was assessed. In addition, stratified analyses were done by subsite. No effect of ever involuntary smoking exposure either at home or at work was observed for head and neck cancer overall. However, long duration of involuntary smoking exposure at home and at work was associated with an increased risk (OR for >15 years at home, 1.60; 95% CI, 1.12-2.28; P(trend) <0-01; OR for >15 years at work, 1.55; 95% CI, 1.04-2.30; P(trend) = 0.13). The effect of duration of involuntary smoking exposure at home was stronger for pharyngeal and laryngeal cancers than for other subsites. An association between involuntary smoking exposure and the risk of head and neck cancer...