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‣ O aleitamento materno e a alimentação infantil entre os indígenas da região oeste do estado de São Paulo: um movimento entre a tradição e interculturalidade; Breastfeeding and infant feeding among indigenous people of the Western Region of the state of São Paulo : a movement between tradition and interculturality.

Silva, Larissa Mandarano da
Fonte: Biblioteca Digitais de Teses e Dissertações da USP Publicador: Biblioteca Digitais de Teses e Dissertações da USP
Tipo: Tese de Doutorado Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em 27/02/2014 Português
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A população indígena brasileira sofre um acelerado e complexo processo de mudanças nos diversos aspectos de sua vida, inclusive quanto à prática de amamentação, à alimentação e ao reflexo no estado nutricional infantil, decorrentes do contato com não indígenas. Diante disso, buscou-se conhecer a prática da amamentação, da alimentação e o estado nutricional de crianças indígenas com até cinco anos de idade, em uma aldeia localizada na região oeste do estado de São Paulo. Realizou-se um estudo etnográfico, segundo os pressupostos teórico e metodológicos de Cliford Geertz 1, com a associação estatística para a descrição do estado nutricional das 24 crianças que atendiam aos critérios do estudo e 31 mulheres, mães e familiares das crianças do estudo, que auxiliavam nos cuidados alimentares das crianças. Os dados objetivos, sobre o estado nutricional infantil, foram coletados em prontuários, por medidas antropométricas das crianças e entrevistas estruturadas com as mães; os qualitativos foram obtidos por meio de entrevistas em profundidade com as mães, avós e bisavós. A análise das narrativas obtidas resultou em um conjunto de categorias antropológicas agrupadas em dois temas: Aleitamento: tradições e crenças indígenas e As comidas indígenas: reflexo da interculturalidade...

‣ Transformations of the Indigenous population: recent and future trends

Taylor, John
Fonte: Universidade Nacional da Austrália Publicador: Universidade Nacional da Austrália
Tipo: Working/Technical Paper Formato: 316289 bytes; application/pdf
Português
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By the 1970s, the Indigenous population had undergone a series of systematic fluctuations in fertility and mortality levels, uneven over space and time, but ultimately comprehensive and uniform in effect. Current interest is on progress in the prevailing demographic regime of declining natural growth rates based on reductions in both fertility and mortality, with recent trends suggesting that this process may be stalled. Also of interest is the emergence of additional contributors to Indigenous population growth. These include Indigenous births to non-Indigenous women as well as an increased propensity for individuals to declare Indigenous status on census forms. In the more distant past, sociological and political processes have effectively excluded or devalued Indigenous representation in official statistics. In the more recent politics of data collection, efforts are made to encourage identification.; no

‣ The economic status of Indigenous Australians

Altman, Jon C.
Fonte: Universidade Nacional da Austrália Publicador: Universidade Nacional da Austrália
Tipo: Working/Technical Paper Formato: 249452 bytes; application/pdf
Português
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This paper examines the economic status of Indigenous Australians as a self-identifying group. It is an early version of an entry to the 2nd edition of the Encyclopedia of the Australian People, to be published in 2001. Indigenous Australians today face a diversity of economic circumstances. At one end of a spectrum are those residing in urban settings and engaging with the market economy, with varying degrees of success, like other Australians. At the other end are those who reside in remote parts of Australia and maintain important aspects of the Indigenous economy. Despite this heterogeneity, the vast majority of Indigenous people (73 per cent) reside either in towns or in cities, with the remaining 27 per cent residing in small Indigenous towns (so defined because the majority of the population is Indigenous), on pastoral stations or at outstations. It can be argued that nowhere are the differences between Indigenous institutions and those of the colonisers of Australia more marked than in the economic system. Measures of economic status are primarily statistical and based on the social indicator approach. The social indicators utilised in this paper provide data that differentiates Indigenous from non-Indigenous Australians in relation to employment...

‣ The health status of Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians

Booth, Alison L; Carroll, Nick
Fonte: Universidade Nacional da Austrália Publicador: Universidade Nacional da Austrália
Tipo: Working/Technical Paper Formato: 535304 bytes; 350 bytes; application/pdf; application/octet-stream
Português
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We use unique survey data to examine the determinants of self-assessed health of Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians. We explore the degree to which differences in health are due to differences in socio-economic factors, and examine the sensitivity of our results to the inclusion of ‘objective’ health measures. Our results reveal that there is a significant gap in the health status of Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians, with the former characterised by significantly worse health. These findings are robust to alternative estimation methods and measures of health. Although between one third and one half of the health gap can be explained by differences in socio-economic status – such as income, employment status and education - there remains a large unexplained component. These findings have important policy implications. They suggest that, in order to reduce the gap in health status between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians, it is important to address disparities in socio-economic factors such as education. The findings also suggest that there are disparities in access to health services and in health behaviour. These issues need to be tackled before Australia can truly claim to have 100% health-care coverage and high levels of health and life expectancy for all of its population.; no

‣ Indigenous economic futures in the Northern Territory: the demographic and socioeconomic background

Taylor, John
Fonte: Universidade Nacional da Austrália Publicador: Universidade Nacional da Austrália
Tipo: Working/Technical Paper Formato: 406041 bytes; 355 bytes; application/pdf; application/octet-stream
Português
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This paper examines 1996 and 2001 Census data to establish recent changes in Indigenous and non-Indigenous employment and income status in the Northern Territory. Also explored are some of the constraints and opportunities facing Indigenous people in their effort to increase their share of Territory income and raise their levels of participation in the labour market. The paper builds on previous analyses of Indigenous employment and income indicators for the Northern Territory, providing a window on recent trends in relative economic status. This time series is then extended by projecting the Indigenous workingage population and likely employment outcomes to 2011, in an attempt to estimate the scale of the task ahead for Indigenous people and governments as they attempt to raise Indigenous economic status. The findings suggest that the scale of this task is growing with time—Indigenous employment in the mainstream labour market is trending downwards along with the overall level of labour force participation, while the income gap between Indigenous and other Territory residents is widening. Given projected expansion of the working age population, the numbers in work need to rise just to keep the already low employment rate from falling further. The Northern Territory has a serious economic development problem—around one fifth of its resident adult population remains impoverished...

‣ Variation in mortality rates in Australia: correlation with Indigenous status, remoteness and socio-economic deprivation

Wilkinson, D.; Ryan, P.; Hiller, J.
Fonte: Oxford University Press Publicador: Oxford University Press
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2001 Português
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57.92587%
Background.The aim of this study was to study ecological correlations between age-adjusted all-cause mortality rates in Australian statistical divisions and (1) the proportion of residents that self-identify as Indigenous, (2) remoteness, and (3) socio-economic deprivation. Method.All-cause mortality rates for 57 statistical divisions were calculated and directly standardized to the 1997 Australian population in 5-year age groups using Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) data. The proportion of residents who self-identified as Indigenous was obtained from the 1996 Census. Remoteness was measured using ARIA (Accessibility and Remoteness Index for Australia) values. Socioeconomic deprivation was measured using SEIFA (Socio-Economic Index for Australia) values from the ABS. Results.Age-standardized all-cause mortality varies two-fold from 5.7 to 11.3 per 1000 across Australian statistical divisions. Strongest correlation was between Indigenous status and mortality (r = 0.69, p < 0.001). Correlation between remoteness and mortality was modest (r = 0.39, p = 0.002) as was correlation between socio-economic deprivation and mortality (r=-0.42, p=0.001). Excluding the three divisions with the highest mortality, a multiple regression model using the logarithm of the adjusted mortality rate as the dependent variable showed that the partial correlation (and hence proportion of the variance explained) for Indigenous status was 0.03 (9 per cent; p=0.03)...

‣ Oral health inequalities among indigenous and nonindigenous children in the Northern Territory of Australia

Jamieson, L.; Armfield, J.; Roberts-Thomson, K.
Fonte: Blackwell Munksgaard Publicador: Blackwell Munksgaard
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2006 Português
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Objective: To describe oral health inequalities among indigenous and nonindigenous children in the Northern Territory of Australia using an area-based measure of socioeconomic status (SES). Methods: Data were obtained from indigenous and nonindigenous 4–13-year-old children enrolled in the Northern Territory School Dental Service in 2002–2003. The Socio-Economic Indices For Areas (SEIFA) were used to determine socioeconomic relationships with dental disease experience. Results: Some 12,584 children were examined, 35.1% of whom were indigenous. Across all age-groups, socially disadvantaged indigenous children experienced higher mean dmft and DMFT levels than their similarly aged, similarly disadvantaged nonindigenous counterparts. Indigenous children aged 5 years had almost four times the dmft of their nonindigenous counterparts in the same disadvantage category (P < 0.05), while indigenous children aged 10 years had almost five times the DMFT of similarly disadvantaged nonindigenous children (P < 0.05). A distinct social gradient was apparent among indigenous and nonindigenous children, respectively, whereby those with the highest dmft/DMFT levels were in the most disadvantaged SES category and those least disadvantaged had the lowest dmft/DMFT levels. In most age-groups...

‣ Indigenous children and receipt of hospital dental care in Australia

Jamieson, L.; Roberts-Thomson, K.
Fonte: Blackwell Publishing Ltd. Publicador: Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2006 Português
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Objective. The aim of this study was to investigate dental procedures received under hospital general anaesthetic by indigenous and non-indigenous Australian children in 2002–2003. Methods. Separation data from 1297 public and private hospitals were obtained from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare National Hospital Morbidity Database for 2002–2003. The dependant variable was the admission rate of children receiving four categories of dental care (i.e. extraction, pulpal, restoration or other). The explanatory variables included sex, age group, indigenous status and location (i.e. major city, regional or remote). Rates were calculated using estimated resident population counts. Results. The sample included 24 874 children aged from 2 to 14 years. Some 4·3% were indigenous (n = 1062). Admission rates for indigenous and non-indigenous children were similar, with indigenous males having 1·2 times the admission rate of indigenous females (P < 0·05). Indigenous children aged < 5 years had 1·4 times the admission rate of similarly aged non-indigenous children (P < 0·001) and 5·0 times the admission rate of 10–14-year-old indigenous children (P < 0·001). Remote-living indigenous children had 1·5 times the admission rate of their counterparts in major cities or regional areas (P < 0·001)...

‣ The role of location in indigenous and non-indigenous child oral health

Jamieson, L.; Armfield, J.; Roberts-Thomson, K.
Fonte: AAPHD National Office Publicador: AAPHD National Office
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2006 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
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Objective: To examine the role of location in Indigenous and non-Indigenous child oral health in three Australian states and territories. The Association of Indigenous status and residential location with caries prevalence, severity and unmet treatment need was examined. Methods: Data were collected as part of a national monitoring suivey of 4–14-year-old children enrolled in school dental services in New South Wales, South Australia and the Northern Territory, Australia. Results: Of the 326,099 children examined, 10,473 (3.2%) were Indigenous. Fewer 4–10-year-old rural Indigenous children were caries-free in the deciduous dentition than their non-Indigenous counterparts and rural Indigenous children had almost twice the mean number of decayed, missing and filled teeth (dmft) of rural non-Indigenous children. The % d/dmft was higher among rural Indigenous children than rural non-Indigenous children. Fewer 6–14-year-old rural Indigenous children were caries-free in the permanent dentition than their non-Indigenous counterparts and rural Indigenous children had almost twice the mean DMFT of rural non-Indigenous children. The % D/DMFT was higher in rural Indigenous than rural non-Indigenous children. Living in a rural location was the strongest indicator of canes prevalence...

‣ Dental caries trends among indigenous and non-indigenous Australian children

Jamieson, L.; Armfield, J.; Roberts-Thomson, K.
Fonte: F D I World Dental Press Ltd Publicador: F D I World Dental Press Ltd
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2007 Português
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Objective To examine trends in dental caries among indigenous and non-indigenous children in an Australian territory. Basic Research Design Routinely-collected data from a random selection of 6- and 12-year-old indigenous and non-indigenous children enrolled in the Northern Territory School Dental Service from 1989–2000 were obtained. The association of indigenous status with caries prevalence (percent dmft or DMFT>0 and percent dmft>3 or DMFT>1), caries severity (mean dmft or DMFT) and treatment need (percent d/dmft or D/DMFT) was examined. Results Results were obtained for 10,687 6- and 12-year old indigenous children and 21,777 6- and 12year-old non-indigenous children from 1989–2000. Across all years, indigenous 6-year-olds had higher caries prevalence in the deciduous dentition, greater mean dmft and percent d/dmft, and indigenous 12-year-olds had greater percent D/DMFT than their non-indigenous counterparts (p<0.05). From 1996–2000 the mean dmft and percent d/dmft for indigenous 6-year-olds and mean DMFT and percent D/DMFT for indigenous 12-year-olds increased, yet remained relatively constant for their non-indigenous counterparts (p<0.05). From 1997–2000, the percent dmft>3 for 6-year-old indigenous children was more than double that of non-indigenous children...

‣ Exploring differences in survival from cancer among indigenous and non-indigenous Australians: Implications for health service delivery and research

Chong, A.; Roder, D.
Fonte: Asian Pacific Organization for Cancer Prevention Publicador: Asian Pacific Organization for Cancer Prevention
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2010 Português
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The aim of this study is to compare cancer survivals of Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians and consider health-service and research implications Cancer registry data from South Australia were used to calculate disease-specific survivals for Indigenous (n=671) and sampled non-Indigenous (n=15,799) patients diagnosed during 1977-2007, using Kaplan-Meier estimates and Cox proportional hazards regression. Indigenous and non-Indigenous five-year survivals were respectively: 40% and 57% for all cancer sites combined; 61% and 80% for female breast; 34% and 56% for colon/rectum; and 63% and 73% for cervix; whereas one-year survivals for cancers of unknown primary site were 5% and 22% respectively. Conversely, although not statistically significant (p=0.262), lung cancer survival tended to be higher in Indigenous than non-Indigenous patients. For all sites combined, Indigenous patients had lower survivals up to 70-79 years. The relative risk of death in Indigenous compared with non-Indigenous patients was 2.0 after adjusting for socio-demographic factors and diagnostic period, reducing to 1.4 when also adjusting for prognosis by primary site. Relative risks were 3.7 and 2.7 respectively for Indigenous compared with non-Indigenous patients from Far North remote communities. We conclude that relative risks for Indigenous compared with non-Indigenous patients for all cancers combined are elevated...

‣ A population-based investigation into inequalities amongst Indigenous mothers and newborns by place of residence in the Northern Territory, Australia

Steenkamp, M.; Rumbold, A.; Barclay, L.; Kildea, S.
Fonte: BioMed Central Ltd. Publicador: BioMed Central Ltd.
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2012 Português
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BACKGROUND: Comparisons of birth outcomes between Australian Indigenous and non-Indigenous populations show marked inequalities. These comparisons obscure Indigenous disparities. There is much variation in terms of culture, language, residence, and access to services amongst Australian Indigenous peoples. We examined outcomes by region and remoteness for Indigenous subgroups and explored data for communities to inform health service delivery and interventions. METHODS: Our population-based study examined maternal and neonatal outcomes for 7,560 mothers with singleton pregnancies from Australia’s Northern Territory Midwives’ Data Collection (2003–2005) using uni- and multivariate analyses. Groupings were by Indigenous status; region (Top End (TE)/Central Australia (CA)); Remote/ Urban residence; and across two large TE communities. RESULTS: Of the sample, 34.1% were Indigenous women, of whom 65.6% were remote-dwelling versus 6.7% of non- Indigenous women. In comparison to CA Urban mothers: TE Remote (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.47, 95%CI: 1.13, 1.90) and TE Urban mothers (aOR 1.36 (95% CI: 1.02, 1.80) were more likely, but CA Remote mothers (aOR 0.43; 95% CI: 0.31, 0.58) less likely to smoke during pregnancy; CA Remote mothers giving birth at >32 weeks gestation were less likely to have attended ≥ five antenatal visits (aOR 0.55; 95%CI: 0.36...

‣ Impact of ethnicity and socio-economic status on Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia incidence and mortality: a heavy burden in Indigenous Australians

Tong, S.; van Hal, S.; Einsiedel, L.; Currie, B.; Turnidge, J.
Fonte: BioMed Central Ltd Publicador: BioMed Central Ltd
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2012 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
38.03957%
Background: Investigations of the impact of ethnicity and socio-economic status on incidence and outcomes of Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia are limited. Methods: We prospectively identified all S. aureus bacteraemia episodes in the Australian New Zealand Cooperative on Outcomes in Staphylococcal Sepsis cohort study between 2007 and 2010. We calculated population level incidence rates using regional postcodes and stratified the analysis by ethnicity, age and socio-economic status indexes. Results: There were 7539 episodes of S. aureus bacteraemia with an annual incidence of 11·2 episodes per 100,000 population. The age-adjusted incidence in the Indigenous population was 62·5 per 100,000 population with an age standardized incidence rate ratio of 5·9 compared to the non-Indigenous population and an incidence rate ratio of 29.2 for community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Populations in the lowest socio-economic status quintile had an increased S. aureus bacteraemia incidence compared to higher quintiles. However, there was a disparity between Indigenous and non-Indigenous populations across all socio-economic status quintiles. The lower 30-day mortality for Indigenous patients (7%) compared to non-Indigenous patients (17%) was explained by differences in age. Conclusions: Indigenous Australians suffer from a higher rate of S. aureus bacteraemia than non-Indigenous Australians...

‣ Impact of age, gender and indigenous status on access to diagnostic coronary angiography for patients presenting with non-ST segment elevation acute coronary syndromes in Australia

Roe, Y.; Zeitz, C.; Mittinty, N.; McDermott, R.; Chew, D.
Fonte: Blackwell Publishing Asia Publicador: Blackwell Publishing Asia
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2013 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
47.30872%
Using Australian guidelines for management of acute coronary syndromes, we investigated the proportion of high-risk patients enrolled in the Acute Coronary Syndromes Prospective Audit registry who received a coronary angiogram. A prospective nationwide multicentre registry involving 39 Australian hospitals was used. The study cohort were patients with high-risk clinical features without ST segment elevation (n = 1948) admitted from emergency departments between 1 November 2005 and 31 July 2007. Eighty nine per cent of patients with ST segment elevation myocardial infarction and only 53% of eligible patients with high-risk acute coronary syndromes with no ST elevation received a diagnostic angiogram. Increasing age was associated with lower rates of angiography; a high-risk patient at the age of ≥70 years was 19% less likely to receive an angiogram than one at the age of <70 years (risk ratio (RR) = 0.81 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.76, 0.76). Women were 26% less likely than men to receive an angiogram (RR = 0.74; 95% CI = 0.65, 0.83). The adjusted RR from the multivariate analysis suggests that a patient at the age of ≥70 years was 35% less likely to receive an angiogram than one at the age of <70 years (RR = 0.65, 95% CI = 0.60...

‣ Does fluoride in the water close the dental caries gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous children?

Lalloo, R.; Jamieson, L.M.; Ha, D.; Ellershaw, A.; Luzzi, L.
Fonte: Wiley Publicador: Wiley
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2014 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
57.933193%
BACKGROUND: Indigenous children experience significantly more dental caries than non-Indigenous children. This study assessed if access to fluoride in the water closed the gap in dental caries between Indigenous and non-Indigenous children. METHODS: Data from four States and two Territories were sourced from the Child Dental Health Survey (CDHS) conducted in 2010. The outcomes were dental caries in the deciduous and permanent dentitions and the explanatory variables were Indigenous status and access to fluoridated water (≥0.5 mg/L) prior to 2008. RESULTS: Dental caries prevalence and severity, for Indigenous and non-Indigenous children, in both dentitions, was lower in fluoridated areas compared to non-fluoridated areas. Among non-Indigenous children, there was a 50.9% difference in mean dmft scores in fluoridated (1.70) compared to non-fluoridated (2.86) areas. The difference between Indigenous children in fluoridated (3.29) compared to non-fluoridated (4.16) areas was 23.4%. Among non-Indigenous children there was a 79.7% difference in the mean DMFT scores in fluoridated (0.68) compared to non-fluoridated (1.58) areas. The difference between Indigenous children in fluoridated (1.59) and non-fluoridated (2.23) areas was 33.5%. CONCLUSION: Water fluoridation is effective in reducing dental caries...

‣ Study Protocol: establishing good relationships between patients and health care providers while providing cardiac care. Exploring how patient-clinician engagement contributes to health disparities between indigenous and non-indigenous Australians in South Australia

Roe, Y.L.; Zeitz, C.J.; Fredericks, B.
Fonte: BioMed Central Publicador: BioMed Central
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2012 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
47.81%
BACKGROUND: Studies that compare Indigenous Australian and non-Indigenous patients who experience a cardiac event or chest pain are inconclusive about the reasons for the differences in-hospital and survival rates. The advances in diagnostic accuracy, medication and specialised workforce has contributed to a lower case fatality and lengthen survival rates however this is not evident in the Indigenous Australian population. A possible driver contributing to this disparity may be the impact of patient-clinician interface during key interactions during the health care process. METHODS/DESIGN: This study will apply an Indigenous framework to describe the interaction between Indigenous patients and clinicians during the continuum of cardiac health care, i.e. from acute admission, secondary and rehabilitative care. Adopting an Indigenous framework is more aligned with Indigenous realities, knowledge, intellects, histories and experiences. A triple layered designed focus group will be employed to discuss patient-clinician engagement. Focus groups will be arranged by geographic clusters i.e. metropolitan and a regional centre. Patient informants will be identified by Indigenous status (i.e. Indigenous and non-Indigenous) and the focus groups will be convened separately. The health care provider focus groups will be convened on an organisational basis i.e. state health providers and Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services. Yarning will be used as a research method to facilitate discussion. Yarning is in congruence with the oral traditions that are still a reality in day-to-day Indigenous lives. DISCUSSION: This study is nestled in a larger research program that explores the drivers to the disparity of care and health outcomes for Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians who experience an acute cardiac admission. A focus on health status...

‣ Interventions for smoking cessation in Indigenous populations

Carson, K.; Brinn, M.; Peters, M.; Veale, A.; Esterman, A.; Smith, B.
Fonte: Update Software Ltd Publicador: Update Software Ltd
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2012 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
47.536084%
Background: Tobacco use in Indigenous populations (people who have inhabited a country for thousands of years) is often double that of the non-Indigenous population. A disproportionate burden of substance-related morbidity and mortality exists as a result. Objectives: To evaluate the effectiveness of smoking cessation interventions in Indigenous populations and to summarise these approaches for future cessation programmes and research. Search methods: The Cochrane Tobacco Addiction Group Specialised Register of Trials was searched (April 2011), with additional searches of MEDLINE (May 2011). Online clinical trial databases and publication references were also searched for potential studies. Selection criteria: We included randomized and non-randomized controlled trials for smoking cessation interventions in Indigenous populations. Interventions could include pharmacotherapies, cognitive and behavioural therapies, alternative therapies, public policy and combination therapies. No attempts were made to re-define Indigenous status for the purpose of including a study in this review. Data collection and analysis: Data pertaining to methodology, participants, interventions and outcomes were extracted by one reviewer and checked by a second...

‣ What is the impact of missing Indigenous status on mortality estimates? An assessment using record linkage in Western Australia

Draper, Glenn K; Somerford, Peter J; Pilkington, Albert; Thompson, Sandra C
Fonte: Public Health Association of Australia Publicador: Public Health Association of Australia
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
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Background: The analysis aimed to assess the Indigenous status of an increasing number of deaths not coded with a useable Indigenous status from 1997 to 2002 and its impact on reported recent gains in Indigenous mortality. Methods: The Indigenous status o

‣ Nutritional status of indigenous children younger than five years of age in Mexico: results of a national probabilistic survey

Rivera,Juan A; Monterrubio,Eric A; González-Cossío,Teresa; García-Feregrino,Raquel; García-Guerra,Armando; Sepúlveda-Amor,Jaime
Fonte: Instituto Nacional de Salud Pública Publicador: Instituto Nacional de Salud Pública
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica Formato: text/html
Publicado em 01/01/2003 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
37.940352%
OBJECTIVE: To compare the prevalence of undernutrition and anemia in indigenous and non-indigenous children <5 years of age at the national level, by region and by urban and rural areas, and to evaluate the degree to which the socioeconomic condition of the family predicts the differences. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A national probabilistic survey was conducted in Mexico in 1999. Indigenous families were identified as those in which at least one woman 12-49 years of age in the household spoke a native language. The prevalence of undernutrition (stunting, wasting and underweight) and anemia was compared between indigenous and non-indigenous children. Probability ratios (PR) were used to compare prevalences in indigenous and non-indigenous children adjusting for socioeconomic status (SES) of the family and for other covariates. RESULTS: The prevalences of stunting and underweight were greater in indigenous than in non-indigenous children. At the national level and in urban areas the prevalences were three times greater and in rural areas ~2 times greater (p<0.05). No differences were found in the prevalence of wasting (p>0.05). The prevalence of anemia in indigenous children was one third greater than in non-indigenous children at the national level (p<0.05) and was between 30 and 60% greater in urban areas and in the regions studied (p<0.05) but was not statistically significant (p>0.05) in rural areas. These differences were reduced to about half when adjusting for SES but remained significantly higher in indigenous children (p<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Indigenous children have higher probabilities of stunting and underweight than non-indigenous children. The differences are larger in urban areas and in higher socioeconomic geographic regions and are explained mostly by socioeconomic factors. The overall difference in the probability of anemia is small...

‣ Nutritional status of indigenous children younger than five years of age in Mexico: results of a national probabilistic survey

Rivera,Juan A; Monterrubio,Eric A; González-Cossío,Teresa; García-Feregrino,Raquel; García-Guerra,Armando; Sepúlveda-Amor,Jaime
Fonte: Instituto Nacional de Salud Pública Publicador: Instituto Nacional de Salud Pública
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica Formato: text/html
Publicado em 01/01/2003 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
37.940352%
OBJECTIVE: To compare the prevalence of undernutrition and anemia in indigenous and non-indigenous children <5 years of age at the national level, by region and by urban and rural areas, and to evaluate the degree to which the socioeconomic condition of the family predicts the differences. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A national probabilistic survey was conducted in Mexico in 1999. Indigenous families were identified as those in which at least one woman 12-49 years of age in the household spoke a native language. The prevalence of undernutrition (stunting, wasting and underweight) and anemia was compared between indigenous and non-indigenous children. Probability ratios (PR) were used to compare prevalences in indigenous and non-indigenous children adjusting for socioeconomic status (SES) of the family and for other covariates. RESULTS: The prevalences of stunting and underweight were greater in indigenous than in non-indigenous children. At the national level and in urban areas the prevalences were three times greater and in rural areas ~2 times greater (p<0.05). No differences were found in the prevalence of wasting (p>0.05). The prevalence of anemia in indigenous children was one third greater than in non-indigenous children at the national level (p<0.05) and was between 30 and 60% greater in urban areas and in the regions studied (p<0.05) but was not statistically significant (p>0.05) in rural areas. These differences were reduced to about half when adjusting for SES but remained significantly higher in indigenous children (p<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Indigenous children have higher probabilities of stunting and underweight than non-indigenous children. The differences are larger in urban areas and in higher socioeconomic geographic regions and are explained mostly by socioeconomic factors. The overall difference in the probability of anemia is small...