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Resultados filtrados por Publicador: MIT - Massachusetts Institute of Technology

‣ Measuring the Impact of Information Technology on Value and Productivity using a Process-Based Approach: The case for RFID Technology

Subirana, Brian; Eckes, Chad; Herman, George; Sarma, Sanjay; Barrett, Michael
Fonte: MIT - Massachusetts Institute of Technology Publicador: MIT - Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Tipo: Trabalho em Andamento Formato: 727217 bytes; application/pdf
Português
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There has been a lot of research addressing the relationship between Information Technology (IT) investments and productivity. Most of the work has been based on firm-level metrics such as total IT investment. We present what we believe is one of the first attempts to create a systematic methodology to assess the impact of IT in business process performance metrics. Our approach builds on the MIT Process Handbook as a basis to both guide the analysis and capture the resulting knowledge for future use. We will present preliminary results on how to use such methodology to analyze the impact of a given IT technology, namely RFID (radio frequency identification devices), in performance metrics of a consumer packaged goods company. We are interested in looking at how IT may impact performance metrics such as productivity, cost and value. We believe our methodology can help CPG companies prioritize their investments. We show results on how the specialization features of the MIT Process Handbook can incorporate performance metrics to help assess such investments in RFID

‣ Measuring the Impact of Information Technology on Value and Productivity using a Process-Based Approach: The case for RFID Technologies

Subirana, Brian; Eckes, Chad; Herman, George; Sarma, Sanjay; Barrett, Michael
Fonte: MIT - Massachusetts Institute of Technology Publicador: MIT - Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Tipo: Trabalho em Andamento Formato: 730108 bytes; application/pdf
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
756.9336%
There has been a lot of research addressing the relationship between Information Technology (IT) investments and productivity. Most of the work has been based on firm-level metrics such as total IT investment. We present what we believe is one of the first attempts to create a systematic methodology to assess the impact of IT in business process performance metrics. Our approach builds on the MIT Process Handbook as a basis to both guide the analysis and capture the resulting knowledge for future use. We will present preliminary results on how to use such methodology to analyze the impact of a given IT technology, namely RFID (radio frequency identification devices), in performance metrics of a consumer packaged goods company. We are interested in looking at how IT may impact performance metrics such as productivity, cost and value. We believe our methodology can help CPG companies prioritize their investments. We show results on how the specialization features of the MIT Process Handbook can incorporate performance metrics to help assess such investments in RFID.

‣ 11.128 Information Technology and the Labor Market, Spring 2003; Information Technology and the Labor Market

Levy, Frank, 1941-
Fonte: MIT - Massachusetts Institute of Technology Publicador: MIT - Massachusetts Institute of Technology
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Português
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In this course, we will explore how information technology is reshaping the U.S. labor market: the mix of occupations, the skills required to perform an occupation, the way work is organized, labor productivity, wage levels and wage inequality. We begin from the perspective the brain is a wonderful information-processing instrument, but in those cases where a computer and the brain can process information in roughly the same way the computer can often do it at lower cost. This fact leads to a pair of crosscutting market forces: Information technology is opening up many new opportunities through its complementarity with some human skills. In both existing and new jobs, information technology is replacing human labor in certain tasks by substituting for other human skills. We will explore the current limits on computer's ability to substitute for human skills, discuss the human skills that computers complement,and assess the net effect of these forces on the labor market.