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‣ Health services research in a quick and dirty world: the New York City hospital occupancy crisis.

Myers, L P; Fox, K S; Vladeck, B C
Fonte: PubMed Publicador: PubMed
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em /12/1990 Português
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In 1987/1988, New York City experienced an unexpected health care crisis: a severe and prolonged communitywide shortage of inpatient hospital beds. A rapid rise in hospital occupancy rates dramatically ended a long-term decline in hospital utilization and left health care providers and policymakers baffled about both cause and remedy. This article describes the course of a short-term, intensive, midcrisis study that unraveled the reasons for the high occupancy rates. As a case study for a research effort that successfully yielded valid and timely results, this article illuminates the research design and methodological decisions that lay behind the findings and discusses the implications of those decisions. Key to the success of the study were a mandate to diagnose the crisis, a statewide patient discharge data base, our previous hands-on experience with that data base, active support for the study from the community of health care providers, and strong results.

‣ Emerging areas of research reported during the CDC National Conference on Pfiesteria: from biology to public health.

Rubin, C; McGeehin, M A; Holmes, A K; Backer, L; Burreson, G; Earley, M C; Griffith, D; Levine, R; Litaker, W; Mei, J; Naeher, L; Needham, L; Noga, E; Poli, M; Rogers, H S
Fonte: PubMed Publicador: PubMed
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em /10/2001 Português
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Since its identification in 1996, the marine dinoflagellate Pfiesteria piscicida Steidinger & Burkholder has been the focus of intense scientific inquiry in disciplines ranging from estuarine ecology to epidemiology and from molecular biology to public health. Despite these research efforts, the extent of human exposure and the degree of human illness directly associated with Pfiesteria is still in the process of being defined. Unfortunately, during this same time Pfiesteria has also stimulated media coverage that in some instances jumped ahead of the science to conclude that Pfiesteria presents a widespread threat to human health. Political and economic forces also came into play when the tourism and seafood industries were adversely impacted by rumors of toxin-laden water in estuaries along the east coast of the United States. Amid this climate of evolving science and public concern, Pfiesteria has emerged as a highly controversial public health issue. In October 2000 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention sponsored the National Conference on Pfiesteria: From Biology to Public Health to bring together Pfiesteria researchers from many disparate disciplines. The goal of this meeting was to describe the state of the science and identify directions for future research. In preparation for the conference an expert peer-review panel was commissioned to review the existing literature and identify research gaps; the summary of their review is published in this monograph. During the meeting primary Pfiesteria researchers presented previously unpublished results. The majority of those presentations are included as peer-reviewed articles in this monograph. The discussion portion of the conference focused upon researcher-identified research gaps. This article details the discussion segments of the conference and makes reference to the presentations as it describes emerging areas of Pfiesteria research.

‣ Development of a research strategy for integrated technology-based toxicological and chemical evaluation of complex mixtures of drinking water disinfection byproducts.

Simmons, Jane Ellen; Richardson, Susan D; Speth, Thomas F; Miltner, Richard J; Rice, Glenn; Schenck, Kathleen M; Hunter, E Sidney; Teuschler, Linda K
Fonte: PubMed Publicador: PubMed
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em /12/2002 Português
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Chemical disinfection of water is a major public health triumph of the 20th century. Dramatic decreases in both morbidity and mortality of waterborne diseases are a direct result of water disinfection. With these important public health benefits comes low-level, chronic exposure to a very large number of disinfection byproducts (DBPs), chemicals formed through reaction of the chemical disinfectant with naturally occurring inorganic and organic material in the source water. This article provides an overview of joint research planning by scientists residing within the various organizations of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Research and Development. The purpose is to address concerns related to potential health effects from exposure to DBPs that cannot be addressed directly from toxicological studies of individual DBPs or simple DBP mixtures. Two factors motivate the need for such an investigation of complex mixtures of DBPs: a) a significant amount of the material that makes up the total organic halide and total organic carbon portions of the DBPs has not been identified; and b) epidemiologic data, although not conclusive, are suggestive of potential developmental, reproductive, or carcinogenic health effects in humans exposed to DBPs. The plan is being developed and the experiments necessary to determine the feasibility of its implementation are being conducted by scientists from the National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory...

‣ Alcoholism treatment service systems: a health services research perspective.

Wallen, J
Fonte: PubMed Publicador: PubMed
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //1988 Português
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This article examines the role of health services research in alcoholism treatment. Alcoholism services research has only recently emerged as a self-defined discipline. Alcoholism services research can be grouped into five classifications: a) descriptive studies of resources for alcoholism treatment and of the use or cost of these services, b) estimates of the need or demand for alcohol services in the population or in particular subpopulations, c) studies of the costs or cost-effectiveness of alcoholism treatment or of alternative treatments, d) studies of the possible "cost-offsets" of treating alcoholism, and e) studies that examine strategies for financing and reimbursement for alcoholism treatment. Research is needed to determine how alcoholism treatment services are now delivered, who uses these services, how treatment setting and organization affect service delivery, who pays for alcoholism treatment, and how reimbursement policies affect the delivery of alcoholism services. Research on large-scale social issues is also needed, such as the effects of warning labels appearing on alcoholic beverage containers or estimates of the overall cost to society of alcohol abuse.

‣ Occupational cancer research in the Nordic countries.

Kjaerheim, K
Fonte: PubMed Publicador: PubMed
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em /05/1999 Português
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Occupational cancer research in the Nordic countries benefits from certain structural advantages, including the existence of computerized population registries, national cancer registries with high-quality data on cancer incidence, and a personal identification number for each inhabitant. This article outlines the utilization of this research infrastructure in Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden, together with research examples from the different countries. Future research on occupational cancer in this region requires that national legislation on electronic handling of sensitive personal information should not be stricter than the European Union Directive on individual protection with regard to personal data. A personal identification number is essential both for keeping up the high quality of data of the registers and for the high quality of the process of linking the different data sources together. Although previous occupational research has focused on male workers, a broader approach is needed in the future, including a study of how cancer risk in women may be affected by occupational activity and the question of possible cancer risk in offspring of men and women exposed to workplace carcinogens.

‣ Opening the black box: an encounter in the corridors of health services research.

Pope, C; Mays, N
Fonte: PubMed Publicador: PubMed
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 30/01/1993 Português
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Health services research has become more prominent as a result of the NHS reforms. Both providers and purchasers want to know exactly where the money is spent and how it could be used more effectively. How best to obtain information about health services is the subject of some debate within and between disciplines engaged in such research. Because of their training doctors are often sceptical of anything other than formal clinical trials and research which produces statistical data. Some sociologists argue that another way to find out what is actually happening in the NHS is to observe people at work and talk to them. This article debates these differing views of research methods. For effective research both quantitative and qualitative approaches need to be used.

‣ Research Ethics Training in Peru: A Case Study

Lescano, A. Roxana; Blazes, David L.; Montano, Silvia M.; Moran, Zoe; Naquira, Cesar; Ramirez, Edwin; Lie, Reidar; Martin, Gregory J.; Lescano, Andres G.; Zunt, Joseph R.
Fonte: Public Library of Science Publicador: Public Library of Science
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 26/09/2008 Português
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With the rapidly increasing number of health care professionals seeking international research experience, comes an urgent need for enhanced capacity of host country institutional review boards (IRB) to review research proposals and ensure research activities are both ethical and relevant to the host country customs and needs. A successful combination of distance learning, interactive courses and expert course instructors has been applied in Peru since 2004 through collaborations between the U.S. Naval Medical Research Center Detachment, the University of Washington and the Department of Clinical Bioethics of the National Institutes of Health to provide training in ethical conduct of research to IRB members and researchers from Peru and other Latin American countries. All training activities were conducted under the auspices of the Peruvian National Institute of Health (INS), Ministry of Health. To date, 927 people from 12 different Latin American countries have participated in several of these training activities. In this article we describe our training model.

‣ Karma, reincarnation, and medicine: Hindu perspectives on biomedical research

Hutchinson, Janis Faye; Sharp, Richard
Fonte: Springer Netherlands Publicador: Springer Netherlands
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Português
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426.01156%
Prior to the completion of the Human Genome Project, bioethicists and other academics debated the impact of this new genetic information on medicine, health care, group identification, and peoples’ lives. A major issue is the potential for unintended and intended adverse consequences to groups and individuals. When conducting research in, for instance, American Indian and Alaskan native (AI/AN) populations, political, cultural, religious and historical issues must be considered. Among African Americans, the Tuskegee Syphilis Experiment is a reminder of racism and discrimination in this country. The goal of the current study is to understand reasons for participating, or not, in genetic research such as the HapMap project and other genetic/medical research from the perspective of the Indian American community in Houston, Texas. In this article, we report on a topic central to this discussion among Indian Americans: karma and reincarnation. Both concepts are important beliefs when considering the body and what should happen to it. Karma and reincarnation are also important considerations in participation in medical and genetic research because, according to karma, what is done to the body can affect future existences and the health of future descendants. Such views of genetic and medical research are culturally mediated. Spiritual beliefs about the body...

‣ Taxonomic Chauvinism Revisited: Insight from Parental Care Research

Stahlschmidt, Zachary R.
Fonte: Public Library of Science Publicador: Public Library of Science
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 31/08/2011 Português
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Parental care (any non-genetic contribution by a parent that appears likely to increase the fitness of its offspring) is a widespread trait exhibited by a broad range of animal taxa. In addition to influencing the fitness of parent(s) and offspring, parental care may be inextricably involved in other evolutionary processes, such as sexual selection and the evolution of endothermy. Yet, recent work has demonstrated that bias related to taxonomy is prevalent across many biological disciplines, and research in parental care may be similarly burdened. Thus, I used parental care articles published in six leading journals of fundamental behavioral sciences (Animal Behaviour, Behavioral Ecology, Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, Ethology, Hormones and Behavior, and Physiology & Behavior) from 2001–2010 (n = 712) to examine the year-to-year dynamics of two types of bias related to taxonomy across animals: (1) taxonomic bias, which exists when research output is not proportional to the frequency of organisms in nature, and (2) taxonomic citation bias, which is a proxy for the breadth of a given article—specifically, the proportion of articles cited that refer solely to the studied taxon. I demonstrate that research on birds likely represents a disproportionate amount of parental care research and...

‣ Designing and Implementing an Ambulatory Oncology Nursing Peer Preceptorship Program: Using Grounded Theory Research to Guide Program Development

Watson, Linda C.; Raffin-Bouchal, Shelley; Melnick, Amy; Whyte, Darlene
Fonte: Hindawi Publishing Corporation Publicador: Hindawi Publishing Corporation
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Português
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Having enough staff to provide high-quality care to cancer patients will become a growing issue across Canada over the next decades. Statistical predictions indicate that both the number of new diagnoses and the prevalence of cancer will increase dramatically in the next two decades. When combining these trends with the simultaneous trend toward health human resource shortage in Canada, the urgency of assuring we have adequate staff to deliver cancer care becomes clear. This research study focuses directly on oncology nurses. Guided by the grounded theory methodology, this research study aims to formulate a strategic, proactive peer preceptorship program through a four-phased research process. The goal of this research is to develop a program that will support experienced staff members to fully implement their role as a preceptor to new staff, to facilitate effective knowledge transfer between experienced staff to the new staff members, and to assure new staff members are carefully transitioned and integrated into the complex ambulatory cancer care workplaces. In this article, the data from the first phase of the research project will be explored specifically as it relates to establishing the foundation for the development of a provincial ambulatory oncology nursing peer preceptorship program.

‣ ‘Transport to Where?’: Reflections on the problem of value and time à propos an awkward practice in medical research

Geissler, P. Wenzel
Fonte: Taylor & Francis Publicador: Taylor & Francis
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
425.1999%
Based upon Kenyan ethnography, this article examines the gap between the bioethics aversion to value transfers in clinical trials, and research participants’ and researchers’ expectations of these. This article focuses upon so-called ‘transport reimbursement’ (TR): monetary payments to participants that are framed as mere refund of transport expenses, but which are of considerable value to recipients. The interest in this case lies not so much in the unsurprising gap between regulatory norms and poor study subjects’ lives, but in the way in which this discrepancy between bioethical discourse and materialities of survival is silenced. In spite of the general awareness that TR indeed is about the material value of research, about value calculation, and expectations of return, it is not publicly discussed as such – unless ironically, in jest, or in private. This double-blindness around ‘reimbursement’ has provoked discussions among ethicists and anthropologists, some of which propose that the work that generates scientific value should be recognised as labour and participants, accordingly, paid. Here, this paper argues that such a re-vision of trial participation as work rather than as a gift for the public good, risks abrogating the possibility of ‘the public’ that is not only a precondition of public medical science...

‣ Journal ratings as predictors of articles quality in Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences: an analysis based on the Italian Research Evaluation Exercise

Bonaccorsi, Andrea; Cicero, Tindaro; Ferrara, Antonio; Malgarini, Marco
Fonte: F1000Research Publicador: F1000Research
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 07/07/2015 Português
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The aim of this paper is to understand whether the probability of receiving positive peer reviews is influenced by having published in an independently assessed, high-ranking journal: we eventually interpret a positive relationship among peer evaluation and journal ranking as evidence that journal ratings are good predictors of article quality. The analysis is based on a large dataset of over 11,500 research articles published in Italy in the period 2004-2010 in the areas of architecture, arts and humanities, history and philosophy, law, sociology and political sciences. These articles received a score by a large number of externally appointed referees in the context of the Italian research assessment exercise (VQR); similarly, journal scores were assigned in a panel-based independent assessment, which involved all academic journals in which Italian scholars have published, carried out under a different procedure. The score of an article is compared with that of the journal it is published in: more specifically, we first estimate an ordered probit model, assessing the probability for a paper of receiving a higher score, the higher the score of the journal; in a second step, we concentrate on the top papers, evaluating the probability of a paper receiving an excellent score having been published in a top-rated journal. In doing so...

‣ Strategies for setting a national research agenda that is responsive to community needs.

O'Fallon, Liam R; Wolfle, Geraldine M; Brown, David; Dearry, Allen; Olden, Kenneth
Fonte: PubMed Publicador: PubMed
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em /12/2003 Português
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Setting a national environmental health research agenda requires broad public input, including that from leading scientists, health care professionals, and communities. Contributions from these diverse constituencies are essential to formulating a research and education strategy that both advances our understanding of the causes and mechanisms of environmentally related diseases and translates such findings into effective prevention and clinical applications to protect those most affected by adverse environmental exposures. Given the increasing number of individual researchers working with communities to address environmental health needs during the past decade, it is also essential for research institutions to foster relationships with communities to understand and respond to their unique public health needs, as well as to communicate research advances in a manner that is both understandable and culturally appropriate. To achieve broad public input and to foster community-university partnerships, the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) supports various workshops, roundtables, and advisory groups. In particular, the NIEHS finds Town Meetings to be a successful model for bringing academic researchers together with community residents...

‣ The research program and priorities of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

Kehrer, B H; Aiken, L H; Blendon, R J; Rogers, D E
Fonte: PubMed Publicador: PubMed
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em /10/1984 Português
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Since its establishment as a national philanthropy in 1972, The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation has appropriated almost $560 million in grants directed toward improvement of health in the United States. Grants are made primarily to develop innovative methods of providing health services, for research and evaluation, and for education and training of health professionals. Since 1972, more than $100 million has been appropriated for research and evaluation projects. The research supported by the Foundation is applied rather than basic, and, like all of the Foundation's programs, must be responsive to the institution's mission. In the 1980s, this mission comprises three objectives: improving access to health care for the most vulnerable underserved population groups, containing increases in health care costs, and improving functional outcomes for patients. In this article, we provide details on the Foundation's research program and priorities, including evolution of the mission, the role of research in the Foundation's overall programs, the purposes for which the Foundation supports research and evaluation activities, and the types of grants available for health services researchers.

‣ Conducting interdisciplinary research to promote healthy and safe employment in health care: promises and pitfalls.

Slatin, Craig; Galizzi, Monica; Melillo, Karen Devereaux; Mawn, Barbara;
Fonte: Association of Schools of Public Health Publicador: Association of Schools of Public Health
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2004 Português
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Due to the complexity of human health, emphasis is increasingly being placed on the need for and conduct of multidisciplinary and/or interdisciplinary health research. Yet many academic and research organizations--and the discipline-specific associations and journals--may not yet be prepared to adopt changes necessary to optimally support interdisciplinary work. This article presents an ongoing interdisciplinary research project's efforts to investigate mechanisms and pathways that lead to occupational health disparities among healthcare workers. It describes the promises and pitfalls encountered during the research,and outlines effective strategies that emerged as a result. Lessons learned include: conflict resolution regarding theoretical and methodological differences; establishing a sense of intellectual ownership of the research, as well as guidelines for multiple authorship; and development and utilization of protocols, communication systems, and tools. This experience suggests a need for the establishment of supportive structures and processes to promote successful interdisciplinary research.

‣ London after Tomlinson. Clinical research.

Green, M.
Fonte: PubMed Publicador: PubMed
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 31/10/1992 Português
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Sir Bernard Tomlinson's report focuses on London's health services, but his proposals have major implications for the future of clinical research--not just in London but in the United Kingdom as a whole. They must be seen in the context of a widely perceived decline in British research and development which also threatens clinical research. This article examines the implications of Tomlinson's proposals and related strategies and recommends the construction of a research market for the patient costs of clinical research to complement the NHS market for patient services introduced in 1991. These arrangements would help sustain the clinical research base and guarantee excellence.

‣ Community-based participatory research as a tool to advance environmental health sciences.

O'Fallon, Liam R; Dearry, Allen
Fonte: PubMed Publicador: PubMed
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em /04/2002 Português
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The past two decades have witnessed a rapid proliferation of community-based participatory research (CBPR) projects. CBPR methodology presents an alternative to traditional population-based biomedical research practices by encouraging active and equal partnerships between community members and academic investigators. The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), the premier biomedical research facility for environmental health, is a leader in promoting the use of CBPR in instances where community-university partnerships serve to advance our understanding of environmentally related disease. In this article, the authors highlight six key principles of CBPR and describe how these principles are met within specific NIEHS-supported research investigations. These projects demonstrate that community-based participatory research can be an effective tool to enhance our knowledge of the causes and mechanisms of disorders having an environmental etiology, reduce adverse health outcomes through innovative intervention strategies and policy change, and address the environmental health concerns of community residents.

‣ Commitment of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences to community-based participatory research for rural health.

O'Fallon, L R; Dearry, A
Fonte: PubMed Publicador: PubMed
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em /06/2001 Português
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425.305%
The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) is the leading biomedical research institution in the United States whose mission is to support research that seeks to understand how environmental exposures affect human health. NIEHS possesses a longstanding interest in the health effects of agrochemical and other environmental exposures in rural America, including pesticides, to farmers and their families and to migrant farmworkers and their families. In recent years, NIEHS has begun augmenting traditional basic science investigations with innovative programs that translate findings from the laboratory to affected populations. It is through community-based participatory research that NIEHS strives to advance the public health field by fostering the development of culturally relevant interventions that will reduce exposures to environmental contaminants and the risk of environmentally induced disease. In this article, we describe the translational research program at NIEHS as it relates to the NIEHS mission and highlight activities pertinent to the health of rural communities, especially underserved populations. We provide an overview of NIEHS-supported projects addressing health concerns of Native American and rural African-American communities in addition to farmworkers. We conclude with a discussion of future plans for community-based participatory research at NIEHS.

‣ Mental health services system research: the National Institute of Mental Health program.

Taube, C A; Burns, B J
Fonte: PubMed Publicador: PubMed
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em /02/1988 Português
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There is a critical need for research to examine the changing mental health services system, to evaluate major innovations in the provision of mental health treatment, and to remove existing barriers to comprehensive and cost-effective care. To achieve these aims, collaboration is needed among government agencies, mental health services programs, academic institutions, and the private sector. The National Institute of Mental Health supports research and research training on the mental health services system primarily through the Division of Biometry and Applied Sciences. This article focuses on the division's three priority research areas of the mental health services system: the provision of mental health care in the primary care sector, the organization and delivery of care for the chronically mentally ill, and financing and reimbursement of care. The various mechanisms of research support are also highlighted.

‣ Collaboration in health services research: on developing relationships between VA researchers and those in other institutions.

Greenlick, M R; Freeborn, D K
Fonte: PubMed Publicador: PubMed
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em /02/1986 Português
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This article explores the potential for collaboration between investigators in institutions outside of the VA and those engaged in research within the VA. The focus is on the potential for collaborative work in health services research; our perspective is that of researchers in a freestanding HMO research center affiliated with the Veterans Administration's Northwest Health Services Research and Development Field Program. The paper begins with a review of the reasons that make collaboration between VA researchers and other health services researchers so appropriate at this time. An example of collaboration is presented, drawing on the experience of the Northwest Field Program and the Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research. Finally, some difficulties inherent in collaboration between VA and other health services researchers are discussed.