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‣ Estudo da interação genótipo × ambiente sobre características de crescimento de bovinos de corte utilizando-se inferência bayesiana

Mascioli, Arthur dos Santos; de Alencar, Mauricio Mello; de Freitas, Alfredo Ribeiro; Martins, Elias Nunes
Fonte: Revista Brasileira Zootecnia Brazilian Journal Animal Sci Publicador: Revista Brasileira Zootecnia Brazilian Journal Animal Sci
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica Formato: 2275-2284
Português
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The objective of this study was to evaluate the genotype x environment interaction for weaning and yearling weights, daily weight gain from weaning to 12 months of age and the growth performance in Canchim (5/8 Charolais + 3/8 Zebu) beef cattle estimated by a principal components analysis including those three traits. The environment was defined by season of birth (first and second semesters of the year). Genetic parameters were estimated by bayesian method with the Gibbs sampler using bivariate analyses (considering the trait in each of the two seasons as a different one) and models that included the fixed effects of year and month of birth, sex and age of cow (linear and quadratic) and the random effects of animal and residual. The results suggested that genetic evaluation and selection in Canchim beef cattle for the traits studied should consider the genotype and season of birth interaction.

‣ Season of birth as a risk factor for multiple sclerosis in Brazil

Becker, Jefferson; Callegaro, Dagoberto; Lana-Peixoto, Marco Aurélio; Ferreira, Maria Lúcia B.; Melo, Ailton; Diniz Da Gama, Paulo; Souza, Doralina G.B.; Teixeira, Carlos A.C.; Kaimen-Maciel, Damacio Ramón; Gonçalves, Marcus Vinícius; Matta, André P
Fonte: Universidade Estadual Paulista Publicador: Universidade Estadual Paulista
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica Formato: 6-10
Português
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Risk factors for development of multiple sclerosis (MS) are still a matter of debate. Latitude gradient, vitamin D deficiency and season of birth are among the most investigated environmental factors associated with the disease. Several international studies suggest that birth in spring is a substantial risk factor for MS. We investigated the season of birth as a potential risk for MS in different geographical regions of Brazil. We conducted a cross-sectional retrospective study with 2257 clinically definite MS patients enrolled in 13 Brazilian MS clinics in the south, southeast, and northeast regions of Brazil. Demographic and clinical data relating to date of birth and clinical features of the disease were collected and analysed, and subsequently compared with birth date among the general Brazilian population. The distribution of date of birth of MS patients showed an increase in spring and a decrease in autumn, with no difference being observed in the other seasons. In conclusion, season of birth is a probable risk factor for MS in most parts of Brazil. These findings may be related to the role that vitamin D plays in MS pathogenesis. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

‣ Female gender but not season of birth is associated with mood seasonality in a near-equatorial Brazilian city

Milfont,Taciano L.; Tilyard,Benjamin A.; Gouveia,Valdiney V.; Tonetti,Lorenzo; Natale,Vincenzo
Fonte: Instituto de Psiquiatria da Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro Publicador: Instituto de Psiquiatria da Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica Formato: text/html
Publicado em 01/01/2012 Português
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OBJECTIVE: Studies conducted mainly in countries located in the Northern Hemisphere have shown that season of birth influences mood seasonality. Greater mood seasonality has been observed for individuals born during spring/summer months than those born during autumn/winter months. Expanding past research to the Southern Hemisphere, in this study we examine the influence of season of birth on mood seasonality in a sample of 1,247 healthy young Brazilians. METHOD: The Seasonal Pattern Assessment Questionnaire was used to compute a global seasonality score as a measure of mood seasonality in a cross-sectional study. RESULTS: Analysis of covariance was conducted to examine the effects of month of birth and gender on mood seasonality, with age entered as a covariate. A main effect of gender was observed, F (1, 1197) = 17.86, p < .01; partial Eta-squared = .02, with mood seasonality being higher for females (M = 8) than for males (M = 7). Contradicting previous findings, no significant main effect for month of birth was observed, F (1, 1197) = 0.65, p > .05. CONCLUSION: The unexpected finding is tentatively explained by differences in geographic location and weather fluctuations between the sampling location in Brazil and other countries where season of birth has been found to influence mood seasonality. Additional studies with larger samples from the Southern Hemisphere are necessary to shed additional light on the possible significant influence of season of birth on mood.

‣ Correlation between schizophrenia and seasonality of birth in a tropical region

Mendonça,Fernanda A. S.; Machado,Diogo R.; Lima,Juliane A. F. de; Bortollotti,Gislaine M. F.; Grilo,Roseana C.; Santos,Gláucia M. T. dos
Fonte: Associação Brasileira de Saúde Coletiva Publicador: Associação Brasileira de Saúde Coletiva
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica Formato: text/html
Publicado em 01/12/2009 Português
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87.93022%
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the statistical relationship between season of birth and schizophrenia in 461 patients hospitalized in three psychiatric facilities in the towns of Araras, Itapira, and Espírito Santo do Pinhal, interior of São Paulo State, southeastern Brazil. METHODS: Date and place of birth of the patients were collected and used to determine the season of birth. Results were analyzed by the chi-square test. Data regarding temperature and rainfall between 1952 and 1986, corresponding to the years of birth of the patients studied, were also obtained. RESULTS: The results showed a higher prevalence of births in the winter months (p = 0.0044), a period characterized in this region by a decline in temperature and rainfall. CONCLUSION: These findings indicate a possible influence of seasonality on the pathogenesis of schizophrenia and suggest that the winter in this region, together with other factors, may contribute to the late development of the disease.

‣ A Study of Skin Color by Melanin Index According to Site, Gestational Age, Birth Weight and Season of Birth in Korean Neonates

Park, Jung-Hun; Lee, Mu-Hyoung
Fonte: The Korean Academy of Medical Sciences Publicador: The Korean Academy of Medical Sciences
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
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Human skin color shows variations throughout life and influenced by various factors such as race, sex, age and hormones. Since the development of spectrophotometer, many studies on human skin color have been done. However, few studies have been carried out to measure the skin color of neonatal infants. The aim of our study was to assess the variations in skin color according to site, gestational age, birth weight and season of birth in Korean neonates. A total of 447 healthy neonates (3 days after birth, 213 males and 234 females) were enrolled in the present study. Skin pigmentation was measured by reflectance spectrophotometer (Derma-Spectrophotometer®, Cortex technology, Hadsund, Denmark) at four different sites (forehead, upper arm, abdomen, and inguinal area). The forehead showed highest melanin index in all sites measured (p<0.05). There was no significant difference according to gestational age, birth weight, and season of birth. This result imply that the skin color in neonates is mainly determined genetically.

‣ Infant mortality, season of birth and the health of older Puerto Rican adults

McEniry, Mary
Fonte: PubMed Publicador: PubMed
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
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The increasing prevalence of heart disease and diabetes among aging populations in low and middle income countries leads to questions regarding the degree to which endogenous early life exposures (exposures in utero) are important determinants of these health conditions. We devised a test using infant mortality (IMR) to verify if season of birth is a good indicator of early life (in utero) conditions that precipitate adult onset of disease. We linked annual infant mortality (IMR) at the municipality (municipio) level from the late 1920s-early 1940s with individual birth year and place using a representative sample of older Puerto Rican adults (n=1447) from the Puerto Rican Elderly: Health Conditions (PREHCO) study. We then estimated the effects of season of birth on adult heart disease and diabetes for all respondents and then for respondents according to whether they were born when IMR was lower or higher, controlling for age, gender, obesity, respondent’s educational level, adult behavior (smoking and exercise) and other early life exposures (childhood health, knee height and childhood socioeconomic status (SES)). The pattern of effects suggests that season of birth reflects endogenous causes: (1) odds of heart disease and diabetes were strong and significant for those born during the lean season in years when IMR was lower; (2) effects remained consistent even after controlling for other childhood conditions and adult behavior; but (3) no seasonality effects on adult health for adults born when IMR was higher. We conclude that in this population of older Puerto Rican adults there is continued support that the timing of adverse endogenous (in utero) conditions such as poor nutrition and infectious diseases may be associated with adult heart disease and diabetes. It will be important to test the validity of these findings in other similar populations in the developing world.

‣ Season of birth and anorexia nervosa

Disanto, Giulio; Handel, Adam E.; Para, Andrea E.; Ramagopalan, Sreeram V.; Handunnetthi, Lahiru
Fonte: Royal College Of Psychiatrists Publicador: Royal College Of Psychiatrists
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em /05/2011 Português
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Our aim was to investigate whether there is a season-of-birth effect in anorexia nervosa. In a meta-analysis, we compared the distribution of anorexia births (n = 1293) from four independent UK cohorts to that of the general UK population (n = 21 914 037), using both the Walter & Elwood seasonality and chi-squared tests. We found an excess of anorexia births from March to June (odds ratio (OR) = 1.15, 95% CI 1.03–1.29, P = 0.012) and a deficit from September to October (OR = 0.8, 95% CI 0.68–0.94, P = 0.007). These results indicate that environmental risk factor(s) are operative during gestation or immediately after birth and their identification will be important for disease prevention strategies.

‣ Season of Birth and the Risk of Hip Fracture in Danish Men and Women Aged 65+

Abrahamsen, Bo; Heitmann, Berit L.; Eiken, Pia A.
Fonte: Frontiers Research Foundation Publicador: Frontiers Research Foundation
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 18/01/2012 Português
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Vitamin D status in pregnant women has been linked to childhood bone mineral density in their offspring but it is unclear if effects extend to fracture risk in adulthood or even old age. As vitamin D levels in the population show pronounced seasonal variation in Denmark, we performed an epidemiological analysis of hip fracture rates as a function of season of birth, age, and sex. We retrieved information on all hip fractures in the 9-year period between 1997 and 2005 in all men and women aged 65–95, excluded hip fractures that occurred in current and recent prednisolone users, and subsequently calculated fracture rates and relative risks. The analysis covered 541,109 men and 691,522 women. In women, we observed a small but statistically significant difference between fracture rates by season of birth for all age intervals expect the youngest (age 65–69). A similar pattern was seen in men, but this was only statistically significant in the two oldest age groups (age 85–89 and 90–95). These findings suggest that vitamin D availability in the first and second trimester of intrauterine life could have a small but lasting impact on bone health and the risk of osteoporotic fractures. Further studies are needed.

‣ Season of birth effect on psychotic-like experiences in Japanese adolescents

Tochigi, Mamoru; Nishida, Atsushi; Shimodera, Shinji; Okazaki, Yuji; Sasaki, Tsukasa
Fonte: Springer-Verlag Publicador: Springer-Verlag
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Português
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A number of studies have investigated seasonality of birth in schizophrenia. Most of the studies have consistently observed an excess of winter births, often associated with decreased summer births. We postulated that psychotic-like experiences (PLEs), subclinical hallucinatory and delusional experiences, may also be affected by birth season. In the present study, we assessed the season of birth effect on the prevalence of PLEs using data from the cross-sectional survey of 19,436 Japanese adolescents. As a result, significant excess of winter births was observed in the prevalence of PLEs, accompanied by a decreased proportion of summer births. The odds ratios for the prevalence of PLEs were estimated to be 1.11, which was on the same order with those for the development of schizophrenia in the previous meta-analytic studies. To our knowledge, this is the first to show the seasonality of birth in the prevalence of PLEs and implicate the winter birth effect on subclinical stage of schizophrenia.

‣ Season of Birth and Later Outcomes: Old Questions, New Answers

Buckles, Kasey S.; Hungerman, Daniel M.
Fonte: PubMed Publicador: PubMed
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Português
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Season of birth is associated with later outcomes; what drives this association remains unclear. We consider a new explanation: variation in maternal characteristics. We document large changes in maternal characteristics for births throughout the year; winter births are disproportionally realized by teenagers and the unmarried. Family background controls explain nearly half of season-of-birth’s relation to adult outcomes. Seasonality in maternal characteristics is driven by women trying to conceive; we find no seasonality among unwanted births. Prior seasonality-in-fertility research focuses on conditions at conception; here expected conditions at birth drive variation in maternal characteristics while conditions at conception are unimportant.

‣ Alterations of White Matter Integrity Related to the Season of Birth in Schizophrenia: A DTI Study

Giezendanner, Stéphanie; Walther, Sebastian; Razavi, Nadja; Van Swam, Claudia; Fisler, Melanie Sarah; Soravia, Leila Maria; Andreotti, Jennifer; Schwab, Simon; Jann, Kay; Wiest, Roland; Horn, Helge; Müller, Thomas Jörg; Dierks, Thomas; Federspiel, Andr
Fonte: Public Library of Science Publicador: Public Library of Science
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 27/09/2013 Português
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In schizophrenia there is a consistent epidemiological finding of a birth excess in winter and spring. Season of birth is thought to act as a proxy indicator for harmful environmental factors during foetal maturation. There is evidence that prenatal exposure to harmful environmental factors may trigger pathologic processes in the neurodevelopment, which subsequently increase the risk of schizophrenia. Since brain white matter alterations have repeatedly been found in schizophrenia, the objective of this study was to investigate whether white matter integrity was related to the season of birth in patients with schizophrenia. Thirty-four patients with schizophrenia and 33 healthy controls underwent diffusion tensor imaging. Differences in the fractional anisotropy maps of schizophrenia patients and healthy controls born in different seasons were analysed with tract-based spatial statistics. A significant main effect of season of birth and an interaction of group and season of birth showed that patients born in summer had significantly lower fractional anisotropy in widespread white matter regions than those born in the remainder of the year. Additionally, later age of schizophrenia onset was found in patients born in winter months. The current findings indicate a relationship of season of birth and white matter alterations in schizophrenia and consequently support the neurodevelopmental hypothesis of early pathological mechanisms in schizophrenia.

‣ Rh System and Intrauterine Growth. Interaction with Season of Birth

Gloria-Bottini, F.; Meloni, G. F.; Finocchi, A.; Porcu, S.; Amante, A.; Bottini, E.
Fonte: IOS Press Publicador: IOS Press
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Português
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Based on the hypothesis that maternal-fetal genetic differences in membrane transport and signal transduction may influence intrauterine development, the recent acquisition on transport function of Rh protein prompted us to study the relationship between joint maternal-fetal Rh phenotype and birth weight. Considering that metabolic effect of maternal-fetal competition could be amplified by environmental conditions, we have investigated possible seasonal effects on such relationship. We have studied 5291 infants born in Sardinia in the period January 1993–December 1996 and 984 infants born in Rome during 1996. In Rh(–) mothers there is a significant association between season of birth and birth weight that shows the highest mean value in infants born in autumn (i.e. conceived in winter). The association is much more evident in male than in female infants. In male infants from Rh(–) mothers, the association between birth weight and season is significant in Rh(+) male newborns only. Recent observations by our group in NIDDM suggest that glucose transport in RBC may be related to D protein, thus we propose an interpretation of the present observation in terms of transport function. When the density of D protein in the infant is greater than in the mother...

‣ Season of Birth Is Associated With Adult Body Mass Index in Patients With Bipolar Disorder

Soreca, Isabella; Cheng, Yu; Frank, Ellen; Fagiolini, Andrea; Kupfer, David J.
Fonte: PubMed Publicador: PubMed
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Português
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Cardiovascular risk factors, such as abdominal obesity and obesity in general, are very prevalent among patients with bipolar disorder (BD). Although long-term use of psychotropic medications is an important determinant of these risk factors, other evidence suggests that early development may interact with the mood disorder diathesis to exponentially increase the risk of obesity. The goal of our study was to test whether season of birth is associated with adult body mass index (BMI) and abdominal obesity in individuals with bipolar disorder. We compared season of birth effects on BMI in 375 adult patients with bipolar disorder and 196 adult patients with unipolar major depression. We found a significant season of birth effect on BMI in patients with bipolar disorder, but not unipolar. In patients with bipolar disorder, season of birth was also associated with waist circumference, with a stronger effect in males. Season of birth affects adult BMI and waist circumference in patients with bipolar disorder, but not in patients with unipolar depression. Our results suggest that early environmental factors, yet to be identified, interact with specific neurobiological features of bipolar disorder to determine stable traits and disease risk factors in adult life.

‣ Season of Birth, Sex and Sleep Timing Preferences

Huang, Yuee; Lin, Dongdong; Lu, Chuanwen; Ali, Gholam; Metzger, James; Shankar, Nivedita; Xu, Tan; Sun, Wenjie; Shan, Guangliang
Fonte: MDPI Publicador: MDPI
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Português
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Objective: To evaluate whether the season of birth and sex are associated with preferences for bedtime among Chinese adults. Methods: A national population-based study on sleep preferences was conducted among Chinese in 2008. A questionnaire was used to collect information on the sleep time of Chinese adults. Analysis of covariance was used to examine the relationship between season of birth and preferences for bedtime. Two sets of potential confounders were used in the adjusted models. Model 1 adjusted for age. Model 2 additionally adjusted for area, occupation, education level, smoking, and drinking. Participants and Measurements: The questionnaire was administered to a sample of 3959 Chinese adults. Results: Men had a higher delayed mean sleep onset and offset time (22:38 and 6:32) than women (22:18 and 6:25). Men also slept for a shorter duration compared to women (7 h 54 min vs. 8 h 7 min). Women born in fall had the latest sleep onset time sleep offset time (22:23/6:30), compared to their counterparts born in winter. These associations were attenuated by additional adjustments of more confounders. Conclusions: There were significant differences in sleep timing preferences between men and women. Season of birth was not associated with sleep timing in Chinese adults.

‣ Season of birth and mother and child characteristics : evidence from Spain and Chile

Alba, Alfonso; Cáceres-Delpiano, Julio
Fonte: Universidade Carlos III de Madrid Publicador: Universidade Carlos III de Madrid
Tipo: info:eu-repo/semantics/draft; info:eu-repo/semantics/workingPaper
Publicado em /10/2014 Português
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By using birth certificates for Chile and Spain we investigate differences in mother and child characteristics according to season of birth. Our findings reveal that children born in winter are more likely to have a mother who is a teenager and unmarried at date of birth. Spanish data also reveals that women giving birth in winter are more likely to be out of the labor force, a result largely driven by high skilled mothers. We additionally find that children born in the winter months have fewer weeks of gestation, lower birth weights and smaller size. Finally for Spain, the 2001 population census and the1999 fertility survey confirm the seasonal pattern in mother characteristics, and indicate that it is mostly driven by women who planned the births

‣ Season of birth and risk of endometrial cancer

Rowlands, I.J.; Weinstein, P.; Nagle, C.M.; Spurdle, A.B.; Webb, P.M.; Oehler, M.K.
Fonte: National Cancer Center, Korea Publicador: National Cancer Center, Korea
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2011 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
98.26286%
OBJECTIVES: Season of birth has been associated with adult morbidity and mortality, but few epidemiological studies have examined whether season of birth contributes to the development of cancer. Using data from the Australian National Endometrial Cancer Study, a population-based case-control study of 1399 cases and 1539 controls, we examined the association between season of birth and risk of endometrial cancer. METHODS: Unconditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) for the association between season of birth and endometrial cancer. Additional analyses were stratified by state of birth. RESULTS: Season of birth was not associated with endometrial cancer overall, but there was an increased risk among women born in summer in Tasmania, the most southerly state (OR = 4.46, 95% CI: 1.24-16.06) and non-significant increases in the other southern states. CONCLUSION: Further data are required to confirm these findings, however the observed associations may be due to the longer days and/or greater hours of sunshine in Australia's southerly states in summer, suppressing melatonin levels in summer-born infants and predisposing them to cancer in adulthood.; Ingrid J Rowlands, Philip Weinstein...

‣ Season of Birth is Associated with Anthropometric and Neurocognitive Outcomes During Infancy and Childhood in a General Population Birth Cohort

Lieberman, Daniel Eric; McGrath, John J.; Saha, Sukanta; Buka, Stephen L.
Fonte: Elsevier Publicador: Elsevier
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Português
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The 'season of birth' effect is one of the most consistently replicated associations in schizophrenia epidemiology. In contrast, the association between season of birth and development in the general population is relatively poorly understood. The aim of this study was to explore the impact of season of birth on various anthropometric and neurocognitive variables from birth to age seven in a large, community-based birth cohort. A sample of white singleton infants born after 37 weeks gestation (n =22,123) was drawn from the US Collaborative Perinatal Project. Anthropometric variables (weight, head circumference, length/height) and various measures of neurocognitive development, were assessed at birth, 8 months, 4 and 7 years of age. Compared to summer/autumn born infants, winter/spring born infants were significantly longer at birth, and at age seven were significantly heavier, taller and had larger head circumference. Winter/spring born infants were achieving significantly higher scores on the Bayley Motor Score at 8 months, the Graham–Ernhart Block Test at age 4, the Wechsler Intelligence Performance and Full Scale scores at age 7, but had significantly lower scores on the Bender–Gestalt Test at age 7 years. Winter/spring birth...

‣ The Effects of Season of Birth on the Inflammatory Response to Psychological Stress in Hainan Island, China

Yazawa, Aki; Inoue, Yosuke; Stickley, Andrew; Li, Dandan; Du, Jianwei; Watanabe, Chiho
Fonte: Public Library of Science Publicador: Public Library of Science
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 08/10/2015 Português
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Season of birth (SOB) has been investigated as one of the environmental factors that might epigenetically determine the physiology of individuals. This study investigated the role of SOB in the association between Quality of Life (QOL), a proxy of psychological stress status, and C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration (i.e., inflammatory status) among 1,085 adults (aged 20–57 years old) in Hainan Island, China. High sensitivity CRP concentration was measured in dried blood spot samples, while the abbreviated version of the World Health Organization’s QOL questionnaire was used to gather information on six QOL domains. Analysis stratified by three historically distinct age groups revealed a significant association between CRP concentration, SOB, QOL and an interaction between SOB and QOL among the youngest and oldest groups. In the oldest group, those born in the dry season had a higher CRP concentration with worse QOL whereas in the youngest group, there was a higher CRP concentration with better QOL. Annual per capita rice production, a proxy of population nutritional status in the year of birth, was found to predict CRP concentration only among the second oldest group. These findings suggest that the early environment might affect the immune response to psychological stress in adulthood and that its effect may differ by the time period in which people were born.

‣ A Season-of-Birth/DRD4 Interaction Predicts Maximal Body Mass Index in Women with Bulimia Nervosa

Levitan, Robert D; Kaplan, Allan S; Davis, Caroline; Lam, Raymond W; Kennedy, James L
Fonte: Nature Publishing Group Publicador: Nature Publishing Group
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Português
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We have earlier reported that season of birth interacts with the hypofunctional 7-repeat (7R) allele of the dopamine-4 receptor gene (DRD4) to promote weight gain and obesity in women with seasonal affective disorder (SAD). This study examined whether this gene–environment interaction influences body weight regulation in women with bulimia nervosa (BN). In 188 female probands with BN, we performed an analysis of covariance predicting maximum lifetime body mass index (BMI) using season-of-birth, DRD4 genotype (7R present/absent), and past history of anorexia nervosa (yes/no) as independent variables, and age at maximum weight as the co-variate. Consistent with our SAD study, the birth-season × DRD4 interaction was a significant predictor of maximal BMI. Although in SAD, the spring-birth/7R+ group had markedly elevated maximal BMIs and high rates of obesity, in this BN sample, the fall-birth/7R+ group exhibited the highest BMI values (N=17: mean maximal BMI=28.2 kg/m2 (SE 0.9) vs 25.2 kg/ m2 (SE 0.3) for all other probands combined (N=171); p=0.002). The lifetime rate of obesity (BMI>30) was also higher in the fall-birth/7R+ vs ‘other' group (29.9 vs 8.8%, respectively, p=0.008). These data offer further evidence that season of birth interacts with the 7R allele of DRD4 to influence body weight regulation in female overeating populations.

‣ Correlation between schizophrenia and seasonality of birth in a tropical region

Mendonça,Fernanda A. S.; Machado,Diogo R.; Lima,Juliane A. F. de; Bortollotti,Gislaine M. F.; Grilo,Roseana C.; Santos,Gláucia M. T. dos
Fonte: Associação Brasileira de Pós -Graduação em Saúde Coletiva Publicador: Associação Brasileira de Pós -Graduação em Saúde Coletiva
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica Formato: text/html
Publicado em 01/12/2009 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
87.93022%
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the statistical relationship between season of birth and schizophrenia in 461 patients hospitalized in three psychiatric facilities in the towns of Araras, Itapira, and Espírito Santo do Pinhal, interior of São Paulo State, southeastern Brazil. METHODS: Date and place of birth of the patients were collected and used to determine the season of birth. Results were analyzed by the chi-square test. Data regarding temperature and rainfall between 1952 and 1986, corresponding to the years of birth of the patients studied, were also obtained. RESULTS: The results showed a higher prevalence of births in the winter months (p = 0.0044), a period characterized in this region by a decline in temperature and rainfall. CONCLUSION: These findings indicate a possible influence of seasonality on the pathogenesis of schizophrenia and suggest that the winter in this region, together with other factors, may contribute to the late development of the disease.