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‣ As práticas de vigilância na supervisão técnica de saúde do Butantã - São Paulo (SP): perspectivas para o alcance da vigilância à saúde; Surveillance practices of health technical supervision of Butantã - São Paulo (SP): perspectives to attain health surveillance

Faria, Liliam Saldanha
Fonte: Biblioteca Digitais de Teses e Dissertações da USP Publicador: Biblioteca Digitais de Teses e Dissertações da USP
Tipo: Dissertação de Mestrado Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em 31/05/2007 Português
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A Vigilância à Saúde se constitui como Modelo Assistencial com potencial para a reorganização dos processos de trabalho, a partir da análise de problemas de saúde de grupos sociais de determinado território, valendo-se da intersetorialidade e da participação popular. Neste sentido, o presente estudo teve como objetivo, geral, identificar e analisar a estruturação das ações de vigilância no âmbito da Atenção Básica à Saúde em uma região de saúde. Para tanto, foram entrevistados gerentes de Unidades Básicas de Saúde, da Supervisão de Vigilância Epidemiológica e trabalhadores responsáveis pela Vigilância Epidemiológica de Unidades Básicas de Saúde da Supervisão Técnica de Saúde do Butantã, no Município de São Paulo, totalizando 14 sujeitos. As entrevistas, realizadas no período de fevereiro a abril de 2006, foram gravadas e transcritas na íntegra, sendo resguardadas as devidas precauções éticas. O material foi analisado segundo técnica apropriada de análise de discurso, no marco teórico materialista histórico e dialético dos conceitos de processos de trabalho e saúde-doença. A vigilância epidemiológica constituiu-se como a prática predominante, incluindo seus instrumentos de trabalho tradicionais. Os principais agentes desse trabalho são a enfermeira...

‣ Advancing Surveillance of Chronic and Non-Communicable Disease—A Path Forward

Weitzman, Elissa R.; Waheed, Nadia
Fonte: University of Illinois at Chicago Library Publicador: University of Illinois at Chicago Library
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
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Objective: To characterize current and future approaches to surveillance of chronic and non-communicable diseases and establish the agenda for both methodological and condition-specific progress. Introduction: Major global stakeholder groups including the United Nations, World Health Organization and Institute of Medicine seek to raise awareness of the threat to global health and security of chronic and non-communicable diseases. These conditions comprise 50–85% of the global annual morbidity burden and constitute a major drain on national economies. To move from awareness of this problem to action and amelioration of issues, we need effective means for monitoring and intervening with populations using approaches that span primary, secondary and tertiary prevention. Methods: This session will begin with a discussion of key concepts and terms and their implications for defining target problems, populations and surveillance strategies. We will also begin by reviewing the epidemiologic and economic arguments for advancing surveillance in this area. The discussion will center on a critical assessment of issues related to surveillance of chronic and non-communicable diseases: how do approaches differ from established and evolving approaches to surveillance of infectious disease? Are there opportunities for synergy with current surveillance efforts and assets? Where are new methods needed? How might surveillance approaches be advanced in different regions (e.g....

‣ Deep Packet Inspection in Perspective: Tracing its lineage and surveillance Potentials

Christopher, Parsons
Fonte: The Surveillance Project Publicador: The Surveillance Project
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica Formato: 1100856 bytes; application/pdf
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Internet Service Providers (ISPs) are responsible for transmitting and delivering their customers’ data requests, ranging from requests for data from websites, to that from filesharing applications, to that from participants in Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) chat sessions. Using contemporary packet inspection and capture technologies, ISPs can investigate and record the content of unencrypted digital communications data packets. This paper explains the structure of these packets, and then proceeds to describe the packet inspection technologies that monitor their movement and extract information from the packets as they flow across ISP networks. After discussing the potency of contemporary deep packet inspection devices, in relation to their earlier packet inspection predecessors, and their potential uses in improving network operators’ network management systems, I argue that they should be identified as surveillance technologies that can potentially be incredibly invasive. Drawing on Canadian examples, I argue that Canadian ISPs are using DPI technologies to implicitly ‘teach’ their customers norms about what are ‘inappropriate’ data transfer programs, and the appropriate levels of ISP manipulation of customer data traffic.

‣ Location Technologies: Mobility, Surveillance and Privacy: A Report to the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada under the Contributions Program

Lyon, David; Marmura, Stephen; Peroff, Pasha
Fonte: The Surveillance Project Publicador: The Surveillance Project
Tipo: Relatório Formato: 559798 bytes; application/pdf
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The report looks at the broad context of contemporary surveillance, and how location technologies fit within this increasingly networked and integrated environment. It also comments on developments in other countries -- such as E-911 services in the USA -- that have a bearing on the Canadian situation. Lastly, it attempts to gauge how ordinary citizens, workers, consumers and travelers interact with and respond to location technologies.

‣ A life course approach to measuring socioeconomic position in population surveillance and its role in determining health status.

Chittleborough, Catherine Ruth
Fonte: Universidade de Adelaide Publicador: Universidade de Adelaide
Tipo: Tese de Doutorado
Publicado em //2009 Português
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Measuring socioeconomic position (SEP) in population chronic disease and risk factor surveillance systems is essential for monitoring changes in socioeconomic inequities in health over time. A life course approach in epidemiology considers the long-term effects of physical and social exposures during gestation, childhood, adolescence, and later adult life on health. Previous studies provide evidence that socioeconomic factors at different stages of the life course influence current health status. Measures of SEP during early life to supplement existing indicators of current SEP are required to more adequately explain the contribution of socioeconomic factors to health status and monitor health inequities. The aim of this thesis was to examine how a life course perspective could enhance the monitoring of SEP in chronic disease and risk factor surveillance systems. The thesis reviewed indicators of early life SEP used in previous research, determined indicators of early life SEP that may be useful in South Australian surveillance systems, and examined the association of SEP over the life course and self-rated health in adulthood across different population groups to demonstrate that inclusion of indicators of early life SEP in surveillance systems could allow health inequities to be monitored among socially mobile and stable groups. A variety of indicators...

‣ Influenza surveillance in Victoria, 2006

Fielding, J.; Miller, E.; Adams, J.; Hawking, B.; Grant, K.; Kelly, H.
Fonte: Australian Govt Dept Health and Ageing, Office of Health Protection, Surveillance Branch Publicador: Australian Govt Dept Health and Ageing, Office of Health Protection, Surveillance Branch
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2007 Português
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The Victorian influenza season in 2006 remained within normal seasonal activity thresholds and was relatively mild compared with recent years. The season peaked in mid-August, with influenza-like illness (ILI) rates from general practitioner sentinel surveillance and the Melbourne Medical Locum Service (MMLS), and cases of laboratory-confirmed influenza notified to the Department of Human Services, reaching their zeniths within one week of each other. A total of 74 general practitioners (GPs) participated in the sentinel surveillance in 2006, reporting a total of 136,732 consultations during the surveillance period from May to September inclusive. Participating GPs reported a total of 765 patients with an ILI; an average ILI rate of 5.6 cases per 1,000 consultations. The average ILI rate from the MMLS in the same period was 8.5 cases per 1,000 call-outs. Eighty-two per cent of laboratory-confirmed influenza notifications during the surveillance period were type A; the remainder were type B. Typing indicated circulation of two predominant strains during the season: A/Wisconsin/67/2005(H3N2)-like virus and B/Malaysia/2506/2004-like virus. The influenza vaccine for 2006 contained A/New Caledonia/20/99(H1N1)-like virus, A/California/7/2004(H3N2)-like virus and B/Malaysia/2506/2004-like virus. Commun Dis Intell 2007;31:100–106.; James E Fielding...

‣ Meeting the International Health Regulations (2005) surveillance core capacity requirements at the subnational level in Europe: the added value of syndromic surveillance

Ziemann, Alexandra; Rosenkötter, Nicole; García-Castrillo Riesgo, Luis Gerardo; Fischer, Matthias; Krämer, Alexander; Lippert, Freddy K.; Vergeiner, Gernot; Brand, Helmut; Krafft, Thomas
Fonte: BioMed Central Publicador: BioMed Central
Tipo: info:eu-repo/semantics/article; publishedVersion
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BACKGROUND: The revised World Health Organization's International Health Regulations (2005) request a timely and all-hazard approach towards surveillance, especially at the subnational level. We discuss three questions of syndromic surveillance application in the European context for assessing public health emergencies of international concern: (i) can syndromic surveillance support countries, especially the subnational level, to meet the International Health Regulations (2005) core surveillance capacity requirements, (ii) are European syndromic surveillance systems comparable to enable cross-border surveillance, and (iii) at which administrative level should syndromic surveillance best be applied? DISCUSSION: Despite the ongoing criticism on the usefulness of syndromic surveillance which is related to its clinically nonspecific output, we demonstrate that it was a suitable supplement for timely assessment of the impact of three different public health emergencies affecting Europe. Subnational syndromic surveillance analysis in some cases proved to be of advantage for detecting an event earlier compared to national level analysis. However, in many cases, syndromic surveillance did not detect local events with only a small number of cases. The European Commission envisions comparability of surveillance output to enable cross-border surveillance. Evaluated against European infectious disease case definitions...

‣ Defining conditions for the use of persistent surveillance

Fekkes, Cristina Cameron.
Fonte: Monterey, California. Naval Postgraduate School Publicador: Monterey, California. Naval Postgraduate School
Tipo: Tese de Doutorado Formato: xiv, 67 p. : ill. ;
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Approved for public release, distribution unlimited; Experimentation Directorate (J9) attempts to alleviate this shortfall by proposing a definition: "Persistent Surveillance: an operationally focused surveillance approach that uses a full range of strategic, operational and tactical collection methods to dwell on and revisit a target. Persistent surveillance contributes to the detection and recognition of meaningful changes in an adversary's activities that support planning and executing preemptive actions to prevent likely adversary courses of action." The issue with this definition, as with all current definitions, is the lack of precision in defining what circumstances warrant the use of persistent surveillance. In addition, currently there are no quantifying metrics to determine effectiveness of intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) collection for the use of the persistent surveillance concept (i.e., metrics to show the duration an asset loiters over a target area and the success rate of meeting mission objectives during this time). Without a clear and distinct definition, and metrics, the concept of allocating assets for collection managers to perform persistent surveillance becomes ambiguous. This thesis is to determine key conditions for allocating the use of persistent surveillance through historical analysis of the use of persistent surveillance between the concept's introduction in the 2001 Quadrennial Defense Review (QDR) and the evolution following the 2006 QDR...

‣ Outcome of endoscopy surveillance for Barrett's oesophagus

Bright, T.; Schloithe, A.; Bull, J.; Fraser, R.; Bampton, P.; Watson, D.
Fonte: Blackwell Science Asia Publicador: Blackwell Science Asia
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2009 Português
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Endoscopic surveillance of individuals with Barrett's oesophagus is undertaken to detect early stage oesophageal malignancy. The impact of a surveillance programme on endoscopy resources and disease detection is uncertain. Methods: In 2004, we commenced a structured Barrett's oesophagus surveillance programme. The surveillance protocol specifies surveillance interval and number of oesophageal biopsies required according to previous endoscopy and biopsy findings. The first 3 years of surveillance were reviewed to assess programme adherence, impact on endoscopy resources and the incidence of high-grade dysplasia and adenocarcinoma in patients undergoing surveillance. Results: Four hundred five patients were enrolled in the surveillance programme, and 776 patient years of endoscopy follow-up were analysed. Four-quadrant biopsies every 2 cm throughout the Barrett's oesophagus were performed in 89.8% of endoscopies. A total of 93.7% of patients had surveillance endoscopy performed at the appropriate time interval. Formalizing surveillance was followed by a decrease in the mean time interval for endoscopy surveillance from 16 months to 15 months, although the mode endoscopy surveillance interval lengthened from 1 year to 2 years. The mean number of biopsies per endoscopy increased from 5.9 to 7. In four patients...

‣ Documentation

Surveillance Studies Centre
Fonte: Surveillance Studies Centre Publicador: Surveillance Studies Centre
Tipo: Dataset; Technical Report
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The Globalization of Personal Data (GPD) was an international, multi-disciplinary and collaborative research initiative drawing mainly on the social sciences but also including information, computing, technology studies and law, that explored the implications of processing personal and population data in electronic format from 2004 to 2008. Such data included everything from census statistics to surveillance camera images, from biometric passports to supermarket loyalty cards. The project maintained a strong concern for ethics, politics and policy development around personal data. The project, funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRCC) under its Initiative on the New Economy program, conducted research on why surveillance occurs, how it operates, and what this means for people's everyday lives (See http://www.sscqueens.org/projects/gpd). The unique aspect of the GPD included a major international survey on citizens' attitudes to issues of surveillance and privacy.; There are three data files in this study. The first covers the original 7 countries surveyed in 2006 (Canada, USA, France, Spain, Hungary, Mexico, and Brazil), and the other two cover China (surveyed in 2006) and Japan (surveyed in 2007).; Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRCC)

‣ Reports - General

Surveillance Studies Centre
Fonte: Surveillance Studies Centre Publicador: Surveillance Studies Centre
Tipo: Relatório
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The Globalization of Personal Data (GPD) was an international, multi-disciplinary and collaborative research initiative drawing mainly on the social sciences but also including information, computing, technology studies and law, that explored the implications of processing personal and population data in electronic format from 2004 to 2008. Such data included everything from census statistics to surveillance camera images, from biometric passports to supermarket loyalty cards. The project maintained a strong concern for ethics, politics and policy development around personal data. The project, funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRCC) under its Initiative on the New Economy program, conducted research on why surveillance occurs, how it operates, and what this means for people's everyday lives (See http://www.sscqueens.org/projects/gpd). The unique aspect of the GPD included a major international survey on citizens' attitudes to issues of surveillance and privacy.; There are three data files in this study. The first covers the original 7 countries surveyed in 2006 (Canada, USA, France, Spain, Hungary, Mexico, and Brazil), and the other two cover China (surveyed in 2006) and Japan (surveyed in 2007).; Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRCC)

‣ Reports - Seven-Country

Surveillance Studies Centre
Fonte: Surveillance Studies Centre Publicador: Surveillance Studies Centre
Tipo: Relatório
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
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The Globalization of Personal Data (GPD) was an international, multi-disciplinary and collaborative research initiative drawing mainly on the social sciences but also including information, computing, technology studies and law, that explored the implications of processing personal and population data in electronic format from 2004 to 2008. Such data included everything from census statistics to surveillance camera images, from biometric passports to supermarket loyalty cards. The project maintained a strong concern for ethics, politics and policy development around personal data. The project, funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRCC) under its Initiative on the New Economy program, conducted research on why surveillance occurs, how it operates, and what this means for people's everyday lives (See http://www.sscqueens.org/projects/gpd). The unique aspect of the GPD included a major international survey on citizens' attitudes to issues of surveillance and privacy.; There are three data files in this study. The first covers the original 7 countries surveyed in 2006 (Canada, USA, France, Spain, Hungary, Mexico, and Brazil), and the other two cover China (surveyed in 2006) and Japan (surveyed in 2007).; Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRCC)

‣ Reports - China

Surveillance Studies Centre
Fonte: Surveillance Studies Centre Publicador: Surveillance Studies Centre
Tipo: Relatório
Português
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The Globalization of Personal Data (GPD) was an international, multi-disciplinary and collaborative research initiative drawing mainly on the social sciences but also including information, computing, technology studies and law, that explored the implications of processing personal and population data in electronic format from 2004 to 2008. Such data included everything from census statistics to surveillance camera images, from biometric passports to supermarket loyalty cards. The project maintained a strong concern for ethics, politics and policy development around personal data. The project, funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRCC) under its Initiative on the New Economy program, conducted research on why surveillance occurs, how it operates, and what this means for people's everyday lives (See http://www.sscqueens.org/projects/gpd). The unique aspect of the GPD included a major international survey on citizens' attitudes to issues of surveillance and privacy.; There are three data files in this study. The first covers the original 7 countries surveyed in 2006 (Canada, USA, France, Spain, Hungary, Mexico, and Brazil), and the other two cover China (surveyed in 2006) and Japan (surveyed in 2007).; Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRCC)

‣ Reports - Japan

Surveillance Studies Centre
Fonte: Surveillance Studies Centre Publicador: Surveillance Studies Centre
Tipo: Relatório
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
46.527686%
The Globalization of Personal Data (GPD) was an international, multi-disciplinary and collaborative research initiative drawing mainly on the social sciences but also including information, computing, technology studies and law, that explored the implications of processing personal and population data in electronic format from 2004 to 2008. Such data included everything from census statistics to surveillance camera images, from biometric passports to supermarket loyalty cards. The project maintained a strong concern for ethics, politics and policy development around personal data. The project, funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRCC) under its Initiative on the New Economy program, conducted research on why surveillance occurs, how it operates, and what this means for people's everyday lives (See http://www.sscqueens.org/projects/gpd). The unique aspect of the GPD included a major international survey on citizens' attitudes to issues of surveillance and privacy.; There are three data files in this study. The first covers the original 7 countries surveyed in 2006 (Canada, USA, France, Spain, Hungary, Mexico, and Brazil), and the other two cover China (surveyed in 2006) and Japan (surveyed in 2007).; Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRCC)

‣ Data Files

Surveillance Studies Centre
Fonte: Surveillance Studies Centre Publicador: Surveillance Studies Centre
Tipo: Relatório
Português
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The Globalization of Personal Data (GPD) was an international, multi-disciplinary and collaborative research initiative drawing mainly on the social sciences but also including information, computing, technology studies and law, that explored the implications of processing personal and population data in electronic format from 2004 to 2008. Such data included everything from census statistics to surveillance camera images, from biometric passports to supermarket loyalty cards. The project maintained a strong concern for ethics, politics and policy development around personal data. The project, funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRCC) under its Initiative on the New Economy program, conducted research on why surveillance occurs, how it operates, and what this means for people's everyday lives (See http://www.sscqueens.org/projects/gpd). The unique aspect of the GPD included a major international survey on citizens' attitudes to issues of surveillance and privacy.; There are three data files in this study. The first covers the original 7 countries surveyed in 2006 (Canada, USA, France, Spain, Hungary, Mexico, and Brazil), and the other two cover China (surveyed in 2006) and Japan (surveyed in 2007).

‣ OPINIONS OF SURVEILLANCE IN THE PRE-SNOWDEN ERA: A THREE-COUNTRY COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS

Lockrey, WILLIAM
Fonte: Quens University Publicador: Quens University
Tipo: Tese de Doutorado
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The field of surveillance studies as a whole is sorely lacking empirical data. This thesis includes and analyzes data of public opinions of surveillance across the United States of America, Canada, and the United Kingdom. This thesis uses multiple statistical models at the univariate, bivariate and multivariate levels. Ultimately, a country-stratified complementary log-log regression is used analyze the 2012 Globalization of Personal Data (GPD) follow-up dataset. The findings of this thesis show that the majority of respondents in all three countries find surveillance to be highly intrusive. There is also a positive correlation between the knowledge of surveillance technologies and feelings of intrusion – that is, typically, the more knowledgeable one is about surveillance, the more intrusive they find surveillance. There also appear to be stronger feelings of intrusiveness of surveillance in the United Kingdom in comparison to the United States and Canada. Also, respondent’s form the United Kingdom who believe that community CCTV is not very, or not at all effective show the highest single-variable influence on the feelings of intrusiveness than those who believe it is ‘very effective’ while controlling for all variables. Therefore...

‣ Counter-Surveillance in an Algorithmic World

Dutrisac, James George
Fonte: Quens University Publicador: Quens University
Tipo: Tese de Doutorado Formato: 9867759 bytes; application/pdf
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Surveillance is the act of collecting, analysing, and acting upon information about specific objects, data, or individuals. Recent advances have allowed for the automation of a large part of this process. Of particular interest is the use of computer algorithms to analyse surveillance data. We refer to surveillance that uses this form of analysis as *algorithmic surveillance*. The rapid growth of algorithmic surveillance has left many important questions unasked. Counter-surveillance is the task of making surveillance difficult. To do this, it subverts various components of the surveillance process. Much like surveillance, counter-surveillance has many applications. It is used to critically assess and validate surveillance practices. As well, counter-surveillance serves to protect privacy, civil liberties, and against abuses of surveillance. Unfortunately, counter-surveillance techniques are often considered to be of little constructive use. As such, they are underdeveloped. At present, no counter-surveillance techniques exist that are able to adequately address algorithmic surveillance. In order to develop counter-surveillance methods against algorithmic surveillance, the *process* of surveillance must first be understood. Understanding this process ensures that the necessary components of algorithmic surveillance will be identified and subverted. As such...

‣ Picturing Public Health Surveillance: Tracing the Material Dimensions of Information in Ontario’s Public Health System

French, Martin
Fonte: Quens University Publicador: Quens University
Tipo: Tese de Doutorado Formato: 4041743 bytes; application/pdf
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The aim of this dissertation is to explore public health surveillance from a surveillance studies perspective. The public health system in Ontario, Canada, provides an ideal setting for such exploration, especially because of initiatives that have been undertaken in the wake of the 2003 outbreak of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS). Post-SARS, local public health practice in Ontario has been increasingly overtaken by a system-wide imperative that seeks to transform surveillance through investment in large-scale, information technology (IT). By critiquing the dominant conception of information in social scientific, public health and medical care discourse, and by exploring the increasing integration of large-scale IT into public health surveillance practice, this dissertation considers the uncertain trade-offs involved in the contemporary movement towards large-scale, IT-mediated public health surveillance systems. The theoretical framework that guides this line of inquiry emerges out of a Deleuzian-Latourian tradition in surveillance studies. This framework foregrounds the material assemblages, the network of people, machines, microbes, maladies, organizations, and so on, that make public health surveillance possible. Material assemblages tend to be submerged from view...

‣ A Report on Camera Surveillance in Canada : Part One

Surveillance Camera Awareness Network (SCAN)
Fonte: Quens University Publicador: Quens University
Tipo: Relatório Formato: 3007409 bytes; application/pdf
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Although cameras have been appearing for some years in the streets, shopping malls, airports, train stations, arenas and even convenience stores and taxi-cabs, no one has undertaken a systematic survey of what's happening in the Canadian context. A new report, prepared by the Surveillance Camera Awareness Network (SCAN), offers some of the history of camera surveillance in Canada, the driving forces behind the trends, the deployment of cameras in specific sites and some of the issues, such as the effectiveness of systems, and privacy and civil liberties questions, raised by this relatively new development. The report is not only evidence-based and accurate, but also attuned to the range of views held about camera surveillance, and to finding appropriate ways of using such cameras, in whatever locations they are found. It attempts to express the key findings as plainly as possible, conscious that these will indicate how some groups are more likely than others to be negatively affected by cameras. It is also a work-in-progress. Further details will be added as research is carried out in different cities and contexts.; Office of the Privacy Commissioner, Ottawa, and Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada

‣ Vigilância em saúde no Brasil: os desafios dos riscos sanitários do século XXI e a necessidade de criação de um sistema nacional de vigilância em saúde; Health surveillance in Brazil: the challenges of the sanitary risks in the xxi century and the necessity of a national health surveillance system

AITH, Fernando Mussa Abujamra; DALLARI, Sueli Gandolfi
Fonte: São Paulo Publicador: São Paulo
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
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The technological development experienced in the contemporary world are transforming society and relations between State and people. The mobility of human being has reached levels never before imagined and a person can move from one side of the world to the other side in less than 24 hours. This mobility also includes goods and services, giving the keynote of the globalized world of the XXI Century. In this context, the risks of diseases and others health problems are intensely amplified. Nowadays, an epidemic that begins in China can arrive in Brazil the following day. Brazil recognizes health as a universal right and also consider it a State's obligation. Therefore, the State of Brazil is obligated to organize itself to eliminate or control health risks. Today, the organization of the Brazilian State regarding the surveillance of risks of diseases and other health problems is fragmented and includes sanitary surveillance (focused on goods, products and services), epidemiological surveillance (diseases and investigations of other risks) and environmental surveillance in health (the environment in general, including the workplace). This fragmentation causes problems for the management and consolidation of strategic information for health protection. Brazil has the need to think about an other model of organization that put together all "kinds" of surveillances within a single coordinated system...